IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

Distribución óptima del transporte intermodal: aplicación a la exportación de perecederos


  • Perez-Mesa, Juan Carlos
  • Salinas-Andujar, Jose Antonio


This paper discusses the benefits using intermodal transport for fruit and vegetables. Multi-Criteria Decision Making techniques are applied for optimal allocation between land or intermodal transport. Also a sensitivity analysis is made for knowing changing priorities in decision-makers (exporters) to encourage a modal shift. The results show savings in intermodal transport costs in relation to land transport cost. However the exporter must assume increased time of delivery of goods.

Suggested Citation

  • Perez-Mesa, Juan Carlos & Salinas-Andujar, Jose Antonio, 2010. "Distribución óptima del transporte intermodal: aplicación a la exportación de perecederos," Economia Agraria y Recursos Naturales, Spanish Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 10(2).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:earnsa:99097

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Jorge Alarcon & Jan Van Heemst & Niek De Jong, 2000. "Extending the SAM with Social and Environmental Indicators: An Application to Bolivia," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(4), pages 473-496.
    2. Bicknell, Kathryn B. & Ball, Richard J. & Cullen, Ross & Bigsby, Hugh R., 1998. "New methodology for the ecological footprint with an application to the New Zealand economy," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 149-160, November.
    3. Wissema, Wiepke & Dellink, Rob, 2007. "AGE analysis of the impact of a carbon energy tax on the Irish economy," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(4), pages 671-683, March.
    4. Wiedmann, Thomas & Minx, Jan & Barrett, John & Wackernagel, Mathis, 2006. "Allocating ecological footprints to final consumption categories with input-output analysis," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(1), pages 28-48, January.
    5. Ayres, Robert U & Kneese, Allen V, 1969. "Production , Consumption, and Externalities," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 59(3), pages 282-297, June.
    6. Sanchez-Choliz, Julio & Duarte, Rosa & Mainar, Alfredo, 2007. "Environmental impact of household activity in Spain," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(2), pages 308-318, April.
    7. Li Hong & Pei Dong, Zhang & Chunyu, He & Wang Gang, 2007. "Evaluating the effects of embodied energy in international trade on ecological footprint in China," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(1), pages 136-148, April.
    8. Morilla, Carmen Rodriguez & Diaz-Salazar, Gaspar Llanes & Cardenete, M. Alejandro, 2007. "Economic and environmental efficiency using a social accounting matrix," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(4), pages 774-786, February.
    9. Duarte, Rosa & Mainar, Alfredo & Sánchez-Chóliz, Julio, 2010. "The impact of household consumption patterns on emissions in Spain," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 176-185, January.
    10. Matete, Mampiti & Hassan, Rashid, 2006. "Integrated ecological economics accounting approach to evaluation of inter-basin water transfers: An application to the Lesotho Highlands Water Project," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(1), pages 246-259, November.
    11. McDonald, Garry W. & Patterson, Murray G., 2004. "Ecological Footprints and interdependencies of New Zealand regions," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(1-2), pages 49-67, September.
    12. Glen Peters & Edgar Hertwich, 2006. "Structural analysis of international trade: Environmental impacts of Norway," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(2), pages 155-181.
    13. Leontief, Wassily, 1970. "Environmental Repercussions and the Economic Structure: An Input-Output Approach," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 52(3), pages 262-271, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item


    Agribusiness; Agricultural and Food Policy; F14; Q17;

    JEL classification:

    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade
    • Q17 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agriculture in International Trade


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:earnsa:99097. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.