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Destination Manual Worker or Clerk? Ethnic Differences in the Transition from School to Work


  • Anne Hartung
  • Karel Neels


Investigating the transition from education to employment among school leavers from different ethnic backgrounds, this paper focuses on the structural integration of ethnic minorities through the labour market. Distinguishing blue collar and white collar employment as destination states, proportional hazards models for competing risks are estimated on the basis of the German Socio-Economic Panel (GSOEP). The results reveal that the factors influencing the transition to employment differ considerably depending on the type of employment. The study argues that a sole indicator of unemployment is insufficient to draw conclusions on the integration of ethnic minorities in the labour market.

Suggested Citation

  • Anne Hartung & Karel Neels, 2009. "Destination Manual Worker or Clerk? Ethnic Differences in the Transition from School to Work," Schmollers Jahrbuch : Journal of Applied Social Science Studies / Zeitschrift für Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften, Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 129(2), pages 343-356.
  • Handle: RePEc:aeq:aeqsjb:v129_y2009_i1_q1_p343-356

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Gerlach, Knut & Stephan, Gesine, 1996. "A paper on unhappiness and unemployment in Germany," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 52(3), pages 325-330, September.
    2. Blanchflower, David G. & Oswald, Andrew J., 2004. "Well-being over time in Britain and the USA," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(7-8), pages 1359-1386, July.
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    7. Shields, Michael A. & Wheatley Price, Stephen, 2001. "Exploring the Economic and Social Determinants of Psychological and Psychosocial Health," IZA Discussion Papers 396, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Clark, Andrew E & Oswald, Andrew J, 1994. "Unhappiness and Unemployment," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 104(424), pages 648-659, May.
    9. Nattavudh Powdthavee, 2003. "Are there Regional Variations in the Psychological Cost of Unemployment in South Africa?," Labor and Demography 0310006, EconWPA, revised 28 Oct 2003.
    10. Ai, Chunrong & Norton, Edward C., 2003. "Interaction terms in logit and probit models," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 80(1), pages 123-129, July.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J42 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Monopsony; Segmented Labor Markets


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