IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/aeq/aeqaeq/v61_y2010_is_q5_p9-28.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Germany’s Job Miracle in the World Recession—Shock-Absorbing Institutions in the Manufacturing Sector

Author

Listed:
  • Joachim Möller

Abstract

This paper aims at analyzing the Germany’s so-called job miracle in the aftermath of the World Recession. The massive downturn mainly affected export-oriented manufacturing industries. These industries have shown an astonishingly moderate employment response. Hence there is strong evidence for substantial labor hoarding. By analyzing different branches of manufacturing one can shed some light on the buffering processes that took place at the firm level. It is shown that measures of within-firm flexibility—supported by labor market instruments like short-time work schemes—prevented Germany from major dismissals and a sharp increase in the unemployment rate.

Suggested Citation

  • Joachim Möller, 2010. "Germany’s Job Miracle in the World Recession—Shock-Absorbing Institutions in the Manufacturing Sector," Applied Economics Quarterly (formerly: Konjunkturpolitik), Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 61(Supplemen), pages 9-28.
  • Handle: RePEc:aeq:aeqaeq:v61_y2010_is_q5_p9-28
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Povilas Lastauskas & Julius Stakenas, 2015. "Global Perspective on Structural Labour Market Reforms in Europe," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1534, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    2. Antje Mertens & Miriam Beblo, 2016. "Self-Reported Satisfaction and the Economic Crisis of 2007–2010: Or How People in the UK and Germany Perceive a Severe Cyclical Downturn," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 125(2), pages 537-565, January.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    World Recession; labor market adjustments; labor hoarding; labor market institutions; labor market reforms; business cycle; short-time work schemes;

    JEL classification:

    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor
    • J6 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:aeq:aeqaeq:v61_y2010_is_q5_p9-28. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Deborah Anne Bowen). General contact details of provider: http://www.duncker-humblot.de .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.