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Modeling and Forecasting the Demand for Electricity in New Zealand: A Comparison of Alternative Approaches


  • Koli Fatai
  • Les Oxley
  • Frank G. Scrimgeour


Models of energy demand in New Zealand have typically been based upon either a partial general equilibrium approach or constructed from spreadsheet models. The results created by such methods predict that electricity is forecast to be the fastest growing energy demanded by households and the industrial sector for the next two decades. Furthermore, aggregate electricity demand is forecast to grow at a constant rate for the next two decades. In this paper we attempt to model and forecast electricity demand using a number of recent econometric approaches including Engle-Granger's Error Correction Model, Phillip and Hansen's (1990) Fully Modified Least Squares, and the AutoRegressive Distributed Lag (ARDL) approach of Pesaran et al. (1996, 1998). We identify the model with the smallest forecasting error using a series of forecasting measures and conclude that the new ARDL approach of Pesaran et al., has better forecasting performance than the other approaches considered.

Suggested Citation

  • Koli Fatai & Les Oxley & Frank G. Scrimgeour, 2003. "Modeling and Forecasting the Demand for Electricity in New Zealand: A Comparison of Alternative Approaches," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 1), pages 75-102.
  • Handle: RePEc:aen:journl:2003v24-01-a04

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    11. Hasanov, Fakhri, 2009. "Analyzing price level in a booming economy: the case of Azerbaijan," MPRA Paper 29555, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Pao, H.T., 2009. "Forecasting energy consumption in Taiwan using hybrid nonlinear models," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 34(10), pages 1438-1446.
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    14. Fakhri Hasanov, 2010. "The Impact of Real Oil Price on Real Effective Exchange Rate: The Case of Azerbaijan," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1041, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    15. Nasser Al Dossary & Carol A. Dahl, 2009. "Is Global Gasoline Demand Still as Responsive to Price?," Working Papers 2009-01, Colorado School of Mines, Division of Economics and Business.
    16. Adom, Philip Kofi & Bekoe, William, 2012. "Conditional dynamic forecast of electrical energy consumption requirements in Ghana by 2020: A comparison of ARDL and PAM," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 44(1), pages 367-380.
    17. Pao, Hsiao-Tien, 2006. "Comparing linear and nonlinear forecasts for Taiwan's electricity consumption," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 31(12), pages 2129-2141.
    18. Jamil, Faisal & Ahmad, Eatzaz, 2011. "Income and price elasticities of electricity demand: Aggregate and sector-wise analyses," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(9), pages 5519-5527, September.
    19. Hasanov, Fakhri J. & Bulut, Cihan & Suleymanov, Elchin, 2016. "Do population age groups matter in the energy use of the oil-exporting countries?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 82-99.

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    JEL classification:

    • F0 - International Economics - - General


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