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Model-Based Comparisons of Pool and Bilateral Markets for Electricity

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  • John Bower
  • Derek W. Bunn

Abstract

A variety of market mechanisms have been proposed and implemented around the world in order to create competitive electricity pools and exchanges. However, it is an open question whether pool-based daily auctions or continuous bilateral trading deliver different prices under conditions of market power. In this paper we present a computationally intensive simulation model of the wholesale electricity market in England and Wales to isolate and systematically test the potential impact of alternative trading arrangements on electricity prices. After eight years of trading under a pool-based system, proposals were initiated in 1998 to change the market in England and Wales to bilateral trading. This paper uses an agent-based simulation to evaluate two important aspects of that proposal. The results show that daily bidding with Pay SMP settlement, as in the original Pool day-ahead market, produces the lowest prices while hourly bidding with Pay Bid settlement, as proposed for the bilateral model, produces the highest prices.

Suggested Citation

  • John Bower & Derek W. Bunn, 2000. "Model-Based Comparisons of Pool and Bilateral Markets for Electricity," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 3), pages 1-29.
  • Handle: RePEc:aen:journl:2000v21-03-a01
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    Cited by:

    1. Sarıca, Kemal & Kumbaroğlu, Gürkan & Or, Ilhan, 2012. "Modeling and analysis of a decentralized electricity market: An integrated simulation/optimization approach," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 44(1), pages 830-852.
    2. Azadeh, A. & Skandari, M.R. & Maleki-Shoja, B., 2010. "An integrated ant colony optimization approach to compare strategies of clearing market in electricity markets: Agent-based simulation," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(10), pages 6307-6319, October.
    3. Albert Banal-Estañol & Augusto Rupérez-Micola, 2010. "Are agent-based simulations robust? The wholesale electricity trading case," Economics Working Papers 1214, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    4. Garcia, Alfredo & Arbelaez, Luis E., 2002. "Market power analysis for the Colombian electricity market," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 217-229, May.
    5. Sebastian Just, 2011. "Appropriate contract durations in the German markets for on-line reserve capacity," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 39(2), pages 194-220, April.
    6. Kimbrough, Steven O. & Murphy, Frederic H., 2013. "Strategic bidding of offer curves: An agent-based approach to exploring supply curve equilibria," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 229(1), pages 165-178.
    7. Li, Ying & Flynn, Peter C., 2004. "Deregulated power prices: comparison of diurnal patterns," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(5), pages 657-672, March.
    8. Green, Richard, 2003. "Failing electricity markets: should we shoot the pools?," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 11(3), pages 155-167, September.
    9. Kemppi, Heikki & Perrels, Adriaan, 2003. "Liberalised Electricity Markets - Strengths and Weaknesses in Finland and Nordpool," Research Reports 97, VATT Institute for Economic Research.
    10. Ventosa, Mariano & Baillo, Alvaro & Ramos, Andres & Rivier, Michel, 2005. "Electricity market modeling trends," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(7), pages 897-913, May.
    11. Li, Y. & Flynn, P.C., 2006. "Electricity deregulation, spot price patterns and demand-side management," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 31(6), pages 908-922.
    12. Neuhoff, Karsten & Barquin, Julian & Boots, Maroeska G. & Ehrenmann, Andreas & Hobbs, Benjamin F. & Rijkers, Fieke A.M. & Vazquez, Miguel, 2005. "Network-constrained Cournot models of liberalized electricity markets: the devil is in the details," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 495-525, May.
    13. John J. Nay & Yevgeniy Vorobeychik, 2016. "Predicting Human Cooperation," Papers 1601.07792, arXiv.org, revised Apr 2016.
    14. Green, Richard, 2006. "Market power mitigation in the UK power market," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 76-89, June.
    15. Gorini de Oliveira, Ricardo & Tolmasquim, Mauricio Tiomno, 2004. "Regulatory performance analysis case study: Britain's electricity industry," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(11), pages 1261-1276, July.
    16. Weidlich, Anke & Veit, Daniel, 2008. "A critical survey of agent-based wholesale electricity market models," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 1728-1759, July.
    17. Rafal Weron, 2006. "Modeling and Forecasting Electricity Loads and Prices: A Statistical Approach," HSC Books, Hugo Steinhaus Center, Wroclaw University of Technology, number hsbook0601.
    18. Banal-Estañol, Albert & Rupérez Micola, Augusto, 2011. "Behavioural simulations in spot electricity markets," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 214(1), pages 147-159, October.
    19. Weron, Rafał, 2014. "Electricity price forecasting: A review of the state-of-the-art with a look into the future," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 1030-1081.

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    JEL classification:

    • F0 - International Economics - - General

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