IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/aea/aejpol/v7y2015i4p223-42.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Water Pollution Progress at Borders: The Role of Changes in China's Political Promotion Incentives

Author

Listed:
  • Matthew E. Kahn
  • Pei Li
  • Daxuan Zhao

Abstract

At political boundaries, local leaders have weak incentives to reduce polluting activity because the social costs are borne by downstream neighbors. This paper exploits a natural experiment set in China in which the central government changed the local political promotion criteria and thus incentivized local officials to reduce border pollution along specific criteria. We document evidence of pollution progress with respect to targeted criteria at province boundaries. Heavy metal pollutants, not targeted by the central government, have not decreased in concentration after the regime shift. Using data on the economic geography of key industrial water polluters, we explore possible mechanisms. (JEL D72, O13, O18, P25, P28, Q25, Q53)

Suggested Citation

  • Matthew E. Kahn & Pei Li & Daxuan Zhao, 2015. "Water Pollution Progress at Borders: The Role of Changes in China's Political Promotion Incentives," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 7(4), pages 223-242, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aejpol:v:7:y:2015:i:4:p:223-42
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/pol.20130367
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/pol.20130367
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/aej/pol/app/0704/2013-0367_app.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/aej/pol/ds/0704/2013-0367_ds.zip
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/aej/pol/data/0704/2013-0367_data.zip
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to AEA members and institutional subscribers.

    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. The Dynamics of the Marginal Cost of Reducing Air Pollution in Beijing, China
      by Matthew Kahn in Environmental and Urban Economics on 2018-01-15 22:09:00

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Chen, Zhao & Kahn, Matthew E. & Liu, Yu & Wang, Zhi, 2018. "The consequences of spatially differentiated water pollution regulation in China," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 468-485.
    2. repec:spr:ecogov:v:18:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s10101-017-0197-5 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Jiankun LU & Pi-Han Tsai, 2017. "Signal and Political Accountability: Environmental Petitions in China," Economic Growth Centre Working Paper Series 1711, Nanyang Technological University, School of Social Sciences, Economic Growth Centre.
    4. Xu (Susan) Tang, 2017. "Competition or Coordination: Strategic Environmental Policymaking Across OECD Countries," 2017 Papers pta721, Job Market Papers.
    5. repec:spr:anresc:v:58:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s00168-017-0817-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. repec:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:8:p:1469-:d:108768 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Pei Li & Yi Lu & Tuan-Heww Sng, 2017. "Artificial Administrative Boundaries: Evidence from China," CEH Discussion Papers 09, Centre for Economic History, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    8. Siqi Zheng & Matthew E. Kahn, 2017. "A New Era of Pollution Progress in Urban China?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 31(1), pages 71-92, Winter.
    9. Thomas Stoerk, 2017. "Compliance, Efficiency and Instrument Choice: Evidence from air pollution control in China," GRI Working Papers 273, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • O18 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Urban, Rural, Regional, and Transportation Analysis; Housing; Infrastructure
    • P25 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Urban, Rural, and Regional Economics
    • P28 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Natural Resources; Environment
    • Q25 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Water
    • Q53 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Air Pollution; Water Pollution; Noise; Hazardous Waste; Solid Waste; Recycling

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:aea:aejpol:v:7:y:2015:i:4:p:223-42. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Michael P. Albert). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/aeaaaea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.