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Social Security Reforms: Benefit Claiming, Labor Force Participation, and Long-Run Sustainability

Author

Listed:
  • Selahattin Imrohoroglu
  • Sagiri Kitao

Abstract

This paper develops a general equilibrium life-cycle model with endogenous labor supply in both intensive and extensive margins, consumption, saving, and benefit claiming to measure the long-run effects of a proposed Social Security reform. Agents in the model face medical expenditure, wage, health, and survival shocks. Raising the normal retirement age by two years increases labor supply by 2.8 percent and the capital stock by 12.6 percent, showing that both margins of adjustment are critical. General equilibrium effects are important to account for the effects of reform on savings, although the effects on labor supply are less important. (JEL D91, E21, H55, I13, J22)

Suggested Citation

  • Selahattin Imrohoroglu & Sagiri Kitao, 2012. "Social Security Reforms: Benefit Claiming, Labor Force Participation, and Long-Run Sustainability," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 4(3), pages 96-127, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aejmac:v:4:y:2012:i:3:p:96-127
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/mac.4.3.96
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Dotsey, Michael & Li, Wenli & Yang, Fang, 2015. "Home production and Social Security reform," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 131-150.
    2. Svetlana Pashchenko & Ponpoje Porapakkarm, 2013. "Quantitative Analysis of Health Insurance Reform: Separating Regulation from Redistribution," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 16(3), pages 383-404, July.
    3. Klaus Prettner & David Canning, 2014. "Increasing life expectancy and optimal retirement in general equilibrium," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 56(1), pages 191-217, May.
    4. Svetlana Pashchenko & Ponpoje Porapakkarm, 2016. "Cross-Subsidization in Employer-Based Health Insurance and the Effects of Tax Subsidy Reform," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 69(3), pages 583-612, September.
    5. Ellen R. McGrattan & Edward C. Prescott, 2017. "On financing retirement with an aging population," Quantitative Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 8(1), pages 75-115, March.
    6. HSU Minchung & YAMADA Tomoaki, 2017. "Population Aging, Health Care, and Fiscal Policy Reform: The challenges for Japan," Discussion papers 17038, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    7. Kitao, Sagiri, 2014. "A life-cycle model of unemployment and disability insurance," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 1-18.
    8. Kamila Sommer & William Peterman, 2013. "How Well Did Social Security Mitigate the Effects of the Great Recession?," 2013 Meeting Papers 1150, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    9. Sánchez-Romero, Miguel & Sambt, Jože & Prskawetz, Alexia, 2013. "Quantifying the role of alternative pension reforms on the Austrian economy," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(C), pages 94-114.
    10. Mariacristina De Nardi & Eric French & John Bailey Jones, 2016. "Medicaid Insurance in Old Age," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(11), pages 3480-3520, November.
    11. Grossmann, Volker & Strulik, Holger, 2015. "Optimal social insurance and health inequality," FSES Working Papers 464, Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences, University of Freiburg/Fribourg Switzerland.
    12. repec:red:issued:16-328 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Bullard, James B., 2014. "The rise and fall of labor force participation in the U.S," The Regional Economist, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, April.
    14. Ichiro Muto & Takemasa Oda & Nao Sudo, 2016. "Macroeconomic Impact of Population Aging in Japan: A Perspective from an Overlapping Generations Model," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 64(3), pages 408-442, August.
    15. Bloom, David E. & Sousa-Poza, Alfonso, 2013. "Ageing and productivity," FZID Discussion Papers 63-2012, University of Hohenheim, Center for Research on Innovation and Services (FZID).
    16. KITAO Sagiri, 2016. "Policy Uncertainty and the Cost of Delaying Reform: A case of aging Japan," Discussion papers 16013, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    17. repec:eee:hapoch:v1_457 is not listed on IDEAS
    18. repec:eee:eecrev:v:101:y:2018:i:c:p:512-527 is not listed on IDEAS
    19. Bloom, David E. & Sousa-Poza, Alfonso, 2013. "Ageing and Productivity: Introduction," IZA Discussion Papers 7205, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    20. Sagiri Kitao, 2014. "Sustainable Social Security: Four Options," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 17(4), pages 756-779, October.
    21. Kitao, Sagiri, 2015. "Fiscal cost of demographic transition in Japan," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 37-58.
    22. Brian K. Chen & Hawre Jalal & Hideki Hashimoto & Sze-Chuan Suen & Karen Eggleston & Michael Hurley & Lena Schoemaker & Jay Bhattacharya, 2016. "Forecasting Trends in Disability in a Super-Aging Society: Adapting the Future Elderly Model to Japan," NBER Working Papers 21870, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • H55 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Social Security and Public Pensions
    • I13 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Insurance, Public and Private
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply

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    1. Social Security Reforms: Benefit Claiming, Labor Force Participation, and Long-Run Sustainability (AEJ:MA 2012) in ReplicationWiki

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