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How Relevant Is Malthus for Economic Development Today?

Author

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  • David N. Weil
  • Joshua Wilde

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • David N. Weil & Joshua Wilde, 2009. "How Relevant Is Malthus for Economic Development Today?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(2), pages 255-260, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:99:y:2009:i:2:p:255-60
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/aer.99.2.255
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ahmad, Khalil & Ali, Amjad & Chani, Muhammad Irfan, 2014. "Does sector specific foreign aid matter for fertility? An empirical analysis form Pakistan," MPRA Paper 82528, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2014.
    2. Matteo Cervellati & Uwe Sunde, 2011. "Life expectancy and economic growth: the role of the demographic transition," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 16(2), pages 99-133, June.
    3. Das Gupta, Monica & Bongaarts, John & Cleland, John, 2011. "Population, poverty, and sustainable development : a review of the evidence," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5719, The World Bank.
    4. Quamrul H. Ashraf & David N. Weil & Joshua Wilde, 2013. "The Effect of Fertility Reduction on Economic Growth," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 39(1), pages 97-130, March.
    5. Pietro Peretto & Simone Valente, 2015. "Growth on a finite planet: resources, technology and population in the long run," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 20(3), pages 305-331, September.
    6. Kenneth N. Kuttner & Adam S. Posen, 2011. "How Flexible Can Inflation Targeting Be and Still Work?," Working Paper Series WP11-15, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
    7. Monica Das Gupta, 2014. "Population, Poverty, and Climate Change," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 29(1), pages 83-108.
    8. Thomas Gries & Rainer Grundmann, 2014. "Trade and fertility in the developing world: the impact of trade and trade structure," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 27(4), pages 1165-1186, October.
    9. Hernando Zuleta, 2011. "Factor Shares, Income Distribution and Capital Flows," DEGIT Conference Papers c016_003, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.
    10. Hans-Joachim Voth, 2013. "The Three Horsemen of Riches: Plague, War, and Urbanization in Early Modern Europe," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 80(2), pages 774-811.
    11. Hernando Zuleta, 2015. "Getting Growth Accounting Right," DOCUMENTOS CEDE 013814, UNIVERSIDAD DE LOS ANDES-CEDE.
    12. Shakhnoza Ganisherovna Akramova, 2016. "Demographic Trends And Human Capital Development In Uzbekistan," Working papers 2016-09-11, Voice of Research.
    13. T. Ryan Johnson & Dietrich Vollrath, 2017. "How Tight are Malthusian Constraints?," Working Papers 2017-192-55, Department of Economics, University of Houston.
    14. Dietrich Vollrath, 2011. "The agricultural basis of comparative development," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 16(4), pages 343-370, December.
    15. Wilde, Joshua, 2012. "How substitutable are fixed factors in production? evidence from pre-industrial England," MPRA Paper 39278, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    16. Castells-Quintana, David, 2017. "Malthus living in a slum: Urban concentration, infrastructure and economic growth," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 158-173.
    17. Emilio Depetris-Chauvin & David N. Weil, 2016. "Malaria and Early African Development: Evidence from Sickle Cell Trait," Documentos de Trabajo 472, Instituto de Economia. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile..
    18. David Cuberes & Kevin Tsui, 2011. "Aid and Fertility: What Does the Cross-Country Evidence Show?," Working Papers 2011024, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
    19. Voigtländer, Nico & Voth, Hans-Joachim, 2009. "The Three Horsemen of Growth: Plague, War and Urbanization in Early Modern Europe," CEPR Discussion Papers 7275, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    20. repec:ris:badest:0582 is not listed on IDEAS
    21. Emilio Depetris-Chauvin & David N. Weil, 2013. "Malaria and Early African Development: Evidence from the Sickle Cell Trait," NBER Working Papers 19603, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J11 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Demographic Trends, Macroeconomic Effects, and Forecasts
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence

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