IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/aea/aecrev/v107y2017i5p441-45.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Validating Migration Responses to Flooding Using Satellite and Vital Registration Data

Author

Listed:
  • Joyce J. Chen
  • Valerie Mueller
  • Yuanyuan Jia
  • Steven Kuo-Hsin Tseng

Abstract

Rainfall measures may be imperfect proxies for floods, given factors such as upstream water balance, proximity to rivers, and topography. We check the robustness of flooding-migration relationships by combining nationally-representative survey data with measures of flooding derived from weather stations, gridded products, and remote sensing tools. Linear probability models reveal that extreme flooding is negatively associated with out-migration. Rainfall-based proxies produce results qualitatively similar to those using the satellite-based measure of inundation, but only the latter is able to discern non-monotonic effects throughout the distribution. Moreover, estimates differ widely across areas, suggesting that households respond differently to rainfall and flooding.

Suggested Citation

  • Joyce J. Chen & Valerie Mueller & Yuanyuan Jia & Steven Kuo-Hsin Tseng, 2017. "Validating Migration Responses to Flooding Using Satellite and Vital Registration Data," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 107(5), pages 441-445, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:107:y:2017:i:5:p:441-45
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/aer.p20171052
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.aeaweb.org/articles?id=10.1257/aer.p20171052
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: https://www.aeaweb.org/articles/attachments?retrieve=oh0JRroHw2ZYb2KmXicqNqSMPmlXkQdz
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: https://www.aeaweb.org/articles/attachments?retrieve=mzeNqiIU8vv4Kqz-1Zy3Zt1jM35YHppA
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: https://www.aeaweb.org/articles/attachments?retrieve=qreI3fndGt-_ucI9swXskLG292Vk2g1x
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to AEA members and institutional subscribers.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Cristina Cattaneo & Emanuele Massetti, 2019. "Does Harmful Climate Increase Or Decrease Migration? Evidence From Rural Households In Nigeria," Climate Change Economics (CCE), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 10(04), pages 1-36, November.
    2. Desbureaux, Sébastien & Rodella, Aude-Sophie, 2019. "Drought in the city: The economic impact of water scarcity in Latin American metropolitan areas," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 114(C), pages 13-27.
    3. Tanvir Pavel & Syed Hasan & Nafisa Halim & Pallab Mozumder, 2018. "Natural Hazards and Internal Migration: The Role of Transient versus Permanent Shocks," Working Papers 1806, Florida International University, Department of Economics.
    4. Patrick Lehnert & Michael Niederberger & Uschi Backes-Gellner, 2020. "Proxying Economic Activity with Daytime Satellite Imagery: Filling Data Gaps Across Time and Space," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0165, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW), revised Oct 2020.
    5. Arne Wiig & Minhaj Mahmud & Ivar Kolstad & Päivi Lujala & Sosina Bezu, 2020. "Preparing to leave? Household mobility decisions in climate affected areas of coastal Bangladesh," CMI Working Papers 4, CMI (Chr. Michelsen Institute), Bergen, Norway.
    6. Zhuldyz Ashikbayeva & Marei Fürstenberg & Timo Kapelari & Albert Pierres & Stephan Thies, 2020. "Household level effects of flooding: Evidence from Thailand," TVSEP Working Papers wp-022, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Institute of Development and Agricultural Economics, Project TVSEP.
    7. Sedova, Barbora & Kalkuhl, Matthias, 2020. "Who are the climate migrants and where do they go? Evidence from rural India," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 129(C).
    8. Haoyang Lyu & Zengchuan Dong & Mahendran Roobavannan & Jaya Kandasamy & Saket Pande, 2019. "Rural unemployment pushes migrants to urban areas in Jiangsu Province, China," Palgrave Communications, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 5(1), pages 1-12, December.
    9. Thiede, Brian C. & Chen, Joyce & Mueller, Valerie & Jia, Yuanyuan & Hultquist, Carolynne, 2020. "It’s Raining Babies? Flooding and Fertility Choices in Bangladesh," SocArXiv cz482, Center for Open Science.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • J11 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Demographic Trends, Macroeconomic Effects, and Forecasts
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:107:y:2017:i:5:p:441-45. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Michael P. Albert). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/aeaaaea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.