Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

America's exhausted paradigm: Macroeconomic causes of the financial crisis and great recession

Contents:

Author Info

  • Palley, Thomas I.

Abstract

This paper traces the roots of the current financial crisis to a faulty U.S. macroeconomic paradigm. One flaw in this paradigm was the neo-liberal growth model adopted after 1980 that relied on debt and asset price inflation to drive demand in place of wage growth. A second flaw was the model of U.S. engagement with the global economy that created a triple economic hemorrhage of spending on imports, manufacturing job losses, and off-shoring of investment. Financial deregulation and financial excess are important parts of the story, but they are not the ultimate cause of the crisis. These developments contributed significantly to the housing bubble but they were a necessary part of the neoliberal model, their function being to fuel demand growth by making ever larger amounts of credit easily available. As the neoliberal model slowly cannibalized itself by undermining income distribution and accumulating debt, the economy needed larger speculative bubbles to grow. The flawed model of global engagement accelerated the cannibalization process, thereby creating need for a huge bubble that only housing could provide. However, when that bubble burst it pulled down the entire economy because of the bubble's massive dependence on debt. The old post-World War II growth model based on rising middle-class incomes has been dismantled, while the new neoliberal growth model has imploded. The United States needs a new economic paradigm and a new growth model, but as yet this challenge has received little attention from policymakers or economists. --

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/59308/1/718077881.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Berlin School of Economics and Law, Institute for International Political Economy (IPE) in its series IPE Working Papers with number 02/2009.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:zbw:ipewps:022009

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://www.ipe-berlin.org/
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Thomas Goda, 2013. "The role of income inequality in crisis theories and in the subprime crisis," Working Papers PKWP1305, Post Keynesian Economics Study Group (PKSG).
  2. Thomas I. Palley, 2013. "Gattopardo economics: The crisis and the mainstream response of change that keeps things the same," IMK Working Paper 112-2013, IMK at the Hans Boeckler Foundation, Macroeconomic Policy Institute.
  3. Rastislav Funta, 2011. "Economic Law and Economic Crisis. Where Do We Go From Here? Economic, Legal and Political Dimension," DANUBE: Law and Economics Review, European Association Comenius - EACO, issue 1, pages 65-71, March.
  4. Peter Skott, 2011. "Heterodox macro after the crisis," UMASS Amherst Economics Working Papers 2011-23, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Economics.
  5. Barry Cynamon & Steven Fazzari & Mark Setterfield, 2013. "How the Great Moderation Became a (Contained) Depression and What to Do About It," Working Papers 1303, Trinity College, Department of Economics.
  6. Hein, Eckhard & Truger, Achim, 2010. "Finance-dominated capitalism in crisis – the case for a Global Keynesian New Deal," MPRA Paper 21175, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  7. Thomas I. Palley, 2013. "Europe´s crisis without end: The consequences of neoliberalism run amok," IMK Working Paper 111-2013, IMK at the Hans Boeckler Foundation, Macroeconomic Policy Institute.
  8. Steven Fazzari & Barry Z. Cynamon, 2013. "Inequality and Household Finance during the Consumer Age," INET Research Notes 23, Institute for New Economic Thinking (INET).
  9. Peter Skott, 2011. "Increasing inequality and financial instability," UMASS Amherst Economics Working Papers 2011-20, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Economics.
  10. David Cayla, 2013. "European Debt Crisis: How a Public debt Restructuring Can Solve a Private Debt issue," Post-Print halshs-00845503, HAL.
  11. Thomas Goda, 2013. "Changes in income inequality from a global perspective: an overview," Working Papers PKWP1303, Post Keynesian Economics Study Group (PKSG).
  12. repec:hal:wpaper:halshs-00496921 is not listed on IDEAS

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:zbw:ipewps:022009. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (ZBW - German National Library of Economics).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.