Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Panel data methods and applications to health economics

Contents:

Author Info

  • Andrew M. Jones

Abstract

Much of the empirical analysis done by health economists seeks to estimate the impact of specific health policies and the greatest challenge for successful applied work is to find appropriate sources of variation to identify the treatment effects of interest. Estimation can be prone to selection bias, when the assignment to treatments is associated with the potential outcomes of the treatment. Overcoming this bias requires variation in the assignment of treatments that is independent of the outcomes. One source of independent variation comes from randomised controlled experiments. But, in practice, most economic studies have to draw on non-experimental data. Many studies seek to use variation across time and events that takes the form of a quasi-experimental design, or “natural experiment”, that mimics the features of a genuine experiment. This chapter reviews the data and methods that are used in applied health economics with a particular emphasis on the use of panel data. The focus is on nonlinear models and methods that can accommodate unobserved heterogeneity. These include conditional estimators, maximum simulated likelihood, Bayesian MCMC, finite mixtures and copulas.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.york.ac.uk/media/economics/documents/herc/wp/07_18.pdf
File Function: Main text
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York in its series Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers with number 07/18.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: Aug 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:yor:hectdg:07/18

Contact details of provider:
Postal: HEDG/HERC, Department of Economics and Related Studies, University of York, York, YO10 5DD, United Kingdom
Phone: (0)1904 323776
Fax: (0)1904 323759
Email:
Web page: http://www.york.ac.uk/economics/postgrad/herc/hedg/
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Moran, Valerie & Jacobs, Rowena, 2013. "An international comparison of efficiency of inpatient mental health care systems," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 112(1), pages 88-99.
  2. Laudicella, M & Cookson, R & Jones, A.M & Rice, N, 2008. "Health care deprivation profiles in the measurement of inequality and inequity: an application to GP fundholding in the English NHS," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 08/06, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
  3. Schneider, Udo & Zerth, Jürgen, 2008. "Improving prevention compliance through appropriate incentives," MPRA Paper 8280, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Pierre Koning & Dinand Webbink & N.G. Martin, 2010. "The effect of education on smoking behaviour: New evidence from smoking durations of a sample of twins," CPB Discussion Paper 139, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
  5. Terence C. Cheng & Pravin K. Trivedi, 2014. "Attrition Bias in Panel Data: A Sheep in Wolf’s Clothing? A Case Study Based on the MABEL Survey," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2014n14, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  6. Brit S. Schneider & Udo Schneider & Volker Ulrich, 2007. "Health and the Decision to Invest in Education," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), Justus-Liebig University Giessen, Department of Statistics and Economics, vol. 227(5+6), pages 725-745, December.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:yor:hectdg:07/18. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Jane Rawlings).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.