Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Latent class models for utilisation of health care

Contents:

Author Info

  • Teresa Bago d’Uva

Abstract

This paper explores different approaches to econometric modelling of count measures of health care utilisation, with an emphasis on latent class models. A new model is proposed that combines the features of the two most common approaches- the hurdle model and the finite mixture Negative Binomial. Additionally, the panel structure of the data is taken into account. The proposed model is shown to perform better than the existing models for a particular application with data from the RAND Health Insurance Experiment.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.york.ac.uk/media/economics/documents/herc/wp/05_01.pdf
File Function: Main text
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York in its series Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers with number 05/01.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: Jun 2005
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:yor:hectdg:05/01

Contact details of provider:
Postal: HEDG/HERC, Department of Economics and Related Studies, University of York, York, YO10 5DD, United Kingdom
Phone: (0)1904 323776
Fax: (0)1904 323759
Email:
Web page: http://www.york.ac.uk/economics/postgrad/herc/hedg/
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords:

Other versions of this item:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Andreas Million & Regina T. Riphahn & Achim Wambach, 2003. "Incentive effects in the demand for health care: a bivariate panel count data estimation," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(4), pages 387-405.
  2. Ulf-G. Gerdtham & Pravin K. Trivedi, 2001. "Equity in Swedish health care reconsidered: new results based on the finite mixture model," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 10(6), pages 565-572.
  3. Mullahy, John, 1986. "Specification and testing of some modified count data models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 341-365, December.
  4. Tom Van Ourti, 2004. "Measuring horizontal inequity in Belgian health care using a Gaussian random effects two part count data model," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(7), pages 705-724.
  5. Partha Deb & Ann M. Holmes, 2000. "Estimates of use and costs of behavioural health care: a comparison of standard and finite mixture models," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 9(6), pages 475-489.
  6. Winkelmann, Rainer, 2001. "Health Care Reform and the Number of Doctor Visits - An Econometric Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 317, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. Sergi Jiménez-Mart�n & José M. Labeaga & Maite Mart�nez-Granado, 2002. "Latent class versus two-part models in the demand for physician services across the European Union," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 11(4), pages 301-321.
  8. Ulf- G. Gerdtham, 1997. "Equity in Health Care Utilization: Further Tests Based on Hurdle Models and Swedish Micro Data," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 6(3), pages 303-319.
  9. Partha Deb, 2001. "A discrete random effects probit model with application to the demand for preventive care," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 10(5), pages 371-383.
  10. Santos Silva, Joao M. C. & Windmeijer, Frank, 2001. "Two-part multiple spell models for health care demand," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 104(1), pages 67-89, August.
  11. Winfried Pohlmeier & Volker Ulrich, 1995. "An Econometric Model of the Two-Part Decisionmaking Process in the Demand for Health Care," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 30(2), pages 339-361.
  12. Vuong, Quang H, 1989. "Likelihood Ratio Tests for Model Selection and Non-nested Hypotheses," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 57(2), pages 307-33, March.
  13. Deb, Partha & Trivedi, Pravin K., 2002. "The structure of demand for health care: latent class versus two-part models," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 601-625, July.
  14. Teresa Bago d'Uva, 2005. "Latent class models for use of primary care: evidence from a British panel," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(9), pages 873-892.
  15. Vincenzo Atella & Francesco Brindisi & Partha Deb & Furio C. Rosati, 2003. "Determinants of Access to Physician Services in Italy: A Latent Class Seemingly Unrelated Probit Approach," CEIS Research Paper 36, Tor Vergata University, CEIS.
  16. Martin Schellhorn & Andreas E. Stuck & Christoph E. Minder & John C. Beck, 2000. "Health services utilization of elderly Swiss: evidence from panel data," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 9(6), pages 533-545.
  17. Deb, Partha & Trivedi, Pravin K, 1997. "Demand for Medical Care by the Elderly: A Finite Mixture Approach," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(3), pages 313-36, May-June.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Hole, Arne Risa, 2008. "Modelling heterogeneity in patients' preferences for the attributes of a general practitioner appointment," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 1078-1094, July.
  2. Erik Schokkaert & Tom van Ourti & Diane De Grave & Ann Lecluyse & Carine Van De Voorde, 2007. "Supplemental health insurance and equality of access in Belgium," Center for Economic Studies - Discussion papers ces0729, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Centrum voor Economische Studiën.
  3. Bago d'Uva, Teresa & Jones, Andrew M., 2009. "Health care utilisation in Europe: New evidence from the ECHP," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(2), pages 265-279, March.
  4. Michael Keane & Olena Stavrunova, 2011. "A smooth mixture of Tobits model for healthcare expenditure," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(9), pages 1126-1153, 09.
  5. Munkin M & Trivedi P. K, 2009. "Incentives and Selection Effects of Drug Coverage on Total Drug Expenditure: a Finite Mixture Approach," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 09/22, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
  6. Majo, M.C. & Soest, A.H.O. van, 2011. "The Fixed-Effects Zero-Inflated Poisson Model with an Application to Health Care Utilization," Discussion Paper 2011-083, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
  7. Wouterse, Bram & Huisman, Martijn & Meijboom, Bert R. & Deeg, Dorly J.H. & Polder, Johan J., 2013. "Modeling the relationship between health and health care expenditures using a latent Markov model," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 423-439.
  8. Valerie Albouy & Laurent Davezies & Thierry Debrand, 2009. "Dynamic Estimation of Health Expenditure: A new approach for simulating individual expenditure," Working Papers DT20, IRDES institut for research and information in health economics, revised Jan 2009.
  9. Kristian Bolin & Anna Lindgren & Björn Lindgren & Petter Lundborg, 2009. "Utilisation of physician services in the 50+ population: the relative importance of individual versus institutional factors in 10 European countries," International Journal of Health Care Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 9(1), pages 83-112, March.
  10. Helmut Farbmacher & Peter Ihle & Ingrid Schubert & Joachim Winter & Amelie C. Wuppermann, 2013. "Heterogeneous Effects of a Nonlinear Price Schedule for Outpatient Care," CESifo Working Paper Series 4499, CESifo Group Munich.
  11. José M. R. Murteira & Óscar D. Lourenço, 2007. "Health Care Utilization and Self-Assessed Health Specification of Bivariate Models Using Copulas," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 07/27, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
  12. Jones, A.M, 2010. "Models For Health Care," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 10/01, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
  13. Anne Nolan, 2007. "A dynamic analysis of GP visiting in Ireland: 1995-2001," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(2), pages 129-143.
  14. Óscar Lourenço & Carlota Quintal & Pedro Lopes Ferreira & Pedro Pita Barros, 2007. "A equidade na utilização de cuidados de saúde em Portugal: Uma avaliação baseada em modelos de contagem," Notas Económicas, Faculdade de Economia, Universidade de Coimbra, issue 25, pages 6-26, June.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:yor:hectdg:05/01. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Jane Rawlings).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.