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Family and Childcare Support Public Expenditures and Short-Term Fertility Dynamics

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  • Cosmin Enache

    ()
    (Department of Finance, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, West University of Timisoara, Romania)

Abstract

In a period of very low fertility, effective family and childcare support policy measures are needed. From a wide range of instruments available to government intervention, we focus on public expenditures effects on short-term fertility. Using a sample of 28 European countries in a panel framework, we found that there is a small positive elasticity of crude birth rate to cash benefits related to childbirth and childrearing provided through social security system. Different public services provided to ease the burden of parents and all benefits in kind, means or non-means tested, are found to be insignificant. These results are robust to alternative methods of estimation and country heterogeneity.

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File URL: http://www.feaa.uvt.ro/fisiere/working-papers/2012.FEAA.F.02.pdf
File Function: First version, May, 2012
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by West University of Timisoara, Romania, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration in its series FEAA Working Papers with number 2012.FEAA.F.02.

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Length: 18 pages
Date of creation: 02 May 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wun:wpaper:2012.feaa.f.02

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Keywords: Social Security; Fertility;

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  1. Gary S. Becker, 1981. "A Treatise on the Family," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number beck81-1, July.
  2. Adriaan Kalwij, 2010. "The impact of family policy expenditure on fertility in western Europe," Demography, Springer, vol. 47(2), pages 503-519, May.
  3. Ronald Lee, 2003. "The Demographic Transition: Three Centuries of Fundamental Change," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 17(4), pages 167-190, Fall.
  4. Bruce Chapman & Yvonne Dunlop & Matthew Gray & Amy Liu & Deborah Mitchell, 1999. "The Foregone Earnings From Child Rearing Revisited," CEPR Discussion Papers 407, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
  5. Anne Gauthier, 2007. "The impact of family policies on fertility in industrialized countries: a review of the literature," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer, vol. 26(3), pages 323-346, June.
  6. David E. Bloom & David Canning & G√ľnther Fink, 2008. "Population Aging and Economic Growth," PGDA Working Papers 3108, Program on the Global Demography of Aging.
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