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Transitional Dynamics and the Distribution of Assets

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  • Francesc Obiols-Homs

    (Centro de Investigacion Economica, ITAM)

  • Carlos Urrutia

    (Centro de Investigacion Economica, ITAM)

Abstract

We study the evolution of the distribution of assets in a discrete time, de-terministic growth model with log-utility, a minimum consumption require-ment, Cobb-Douglas technology, and agents differing in initial assets. We prove that the coefficient of variation in assets across agents decreases mono-tonically in a transition to the steady state from below, if (i) the consumption requirement is zero, or (ii) the consumption requirement is not too big and the initial capital stock is large enough. We also show how a positive consumption requirement or a small elasticity of substitution between capital and labor can generate non-monotonic paths for inequality.

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File URL: http://128.118.178.162/eps/mac/papers/0407/0407020.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by EconWPA in its series Macroeconomics with number 0407020.

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Length: 25 pages
Date of creation: 17 Jul 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpma:0407020

Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 25
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Web page: http://128.118.178.162

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Keywords: Income distribution; Transitional Dynamics; Neoclassical Growth Model;

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References

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  1. Jaume Ventura & Francesco Caselli, 2000. "A Representative Consumer Theory of Distribution," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(4), pages 909-926, September.
  2. Mark Huggett & Gustavo Ventura, 1997. "Understanding Why High Income Households Save More Than Low Income Households," Working Papers 9701, Centro de Investigacion Economica, ITAM.
  3. Chatterjee, S. & Ravikumar, B., 1997. "Minimum Consumption Requirements: Theoretical and Quantitative Implications for Growth and Distribution," Working Papers 97-15, University of Iowa, Department of Economics.
  4. repec:cup:macdyn:v:3:y:1999:i:4:p:482-505 is not listed on IDEAS
  5. Atkeson, A. & Ogaki, M., 1991. "Wealth-Varying Intertemporal Elasticities of Substitution Evidence from Panel and Aggregate Data," RCER Working Papers 303, University of Rochester - Center for Economic Research (RCER).
  6. Joseph E. Stiglitz, 1967. "Distribution of Income and Wealth Among Individuals," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 238, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
  7. Chatterjee, Satyajit, 1994. "Transitional dynamics and the distribution of wealth in a neoclassical growth model," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(1), pages 97-119, May.
  8. Huggett, Mark, 1993. "The risk-free rate in heterogeneous-agent incomplete-insurance economies," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 17(5-6), pages 953-969.
  9. Hernandez D, Alejandro, 1991. "The dynamics of competitive equilibrium allocations with borrowing constraints," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 55(1), pages 180-191, October.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Yoshiyasu Ono & Akihisa Shibata, 2006. "Capital Income Taxation and Specialization Patterns: Investment Tax vs. Saving Tax," KIER Working Papers 613, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research.
  2. Chen, Chien-Liang & Kuan, Chung-Ming & Lin, Chu-Chia, 2007. "Saving and housing of Taiwanese households: New evidence from quantile regression analyses," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 102-126, June.
  3. Marcel Aloy & Gilles de Truchis, 2012. "Estimation and Testing for Fractional Cointegration," AMSE Working Papers 1215, Aix-Marseille School of Economics, Marseille, France.
  4. San Vicente Portes, Luis, 2009. "On the distributional effects of trade policy: Dynamics of household saving and asset prices," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 49(3), pages 944-970, August.
  5. Emilio Espino, 2006. "Equilibrium Portfolios in the Neoclassical Growth Model," 2006 Meeting Papers 92, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  6. Beladi, Hamid & Chao, Chi-Chur & Hollas, Daniel, 2013. "How growing asset inequality affects developing economies," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 43-51.
  7. Tamotsu Nakamura, 2014. "On Ramsey's conjecture with AK technology," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 34(2), pages 875-884.
  8. Luis San Vicente Portes, 2005. "On the Distributional Effects of Trade Policy: A Macroeconomic Perspective," Computing in Economics and Finance 2005 358, Society for Computational Economics.
  9. Cecilia García-Peñalosa & Stephen J. Turnovsky, 2012. "Income Inequality, Mobility, and the Accumulation of Capital. The role of Heterogeneous Labor Productivity," AMSE Working Papers 1216, Aix-Marseille School of Economics, Marseille, France.
  10. Ales Bulir & Alma Romero-Barrutieta & Jose Daniel Rodríguez-Delgado, 2011. "The Dynamic Implications of Debt Relief for Low-Income Countries," IMF Working Papers 11/157, International Monetary Fund.
  11. Turnovsky, Stephen J. & Garci­a-Peñalosa, Cecilia, 2008. "Distributional dynamics in a neoclassical growth model: The role of elastic labor supply," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 32(5), pages 1399-1431, May.

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