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Child Labour And Trade Liberalization In A Developing Economy

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Author Info

  • Sarbajit Chaudhuri

    (Dept. of Economics, Calcutta University, India)

  • Manash Ranjan Gupta

    (Economic Research Unit, Indian Statistical Institute, Kolkata, India)

Abstract

The paper analyzes the implications of trade liberalization on the incidence of child labour in a two-sector general equilibrium framework. The supply function of child labour has been derived from the utility maximizing behaviour of the working families. The paper finds that the effect of trade liberalization on the incidence of child labour crucially hinges on the relative factor intensities of the two sectors.

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File URL: http://128.118.178.162/eps/lab/papers/0510/0510017.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by EconWPA in its series Labor and Demography with number 0510017.

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Length: 18 pages
Date of creation: 23 Oct 2005
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpla:0510017

Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 18
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Web page: http://128.118.178.162

Related research

Keywords: Child labour; general equilibrium; trade liberalization;

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References

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  1. Hamid Beladi & Sugata Marjit, 1996. "An Analysis of Rural-Urban Migration and Protection," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 29(4), pages 930-40, November.
  2. Jean-Marie Baland & James A. Robinson, 2000. "Is Child Labor Inefficient?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 108(4), pages 663-679, August.
  3. Sonia Bhalotra, 2007. "Is Child Work Necessary?," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 69(1), pages 29-55, 02.
  4. Ranjan, Priya, 1999. "An economic analysis of child labor," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 99-105, July.
  5. Sarbajit Chaudhuri, 2005. "Incidence Of Child Labour, Free Education Policy And Economic Liberalization In A Developing Economy," Labor and Demography 0511010, EconWPA.
  6. Basu, Kaushik, 1998. "Child labor : cause, consequence, and cure, with remarks on International Labor Standards," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2027, The World Bank.
  7. Dessy, Sylvain E., 2000. "A defense of compulsive measures against child labor," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(1), pages 261-275, June.
  8. Antoine Bommier & Sylvie Lambert, 2000. "Education Demand and Age at School Enrollment in Tanzania," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 35(1), pages 177-203.
  9. Jafarey, Saqib & Lahiri, Sajal, 2002. "Will trade sanctions reduce child labour?: The role of credit markets," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 137-156, June.
  10. Basu, Kaushik & Van, Pham Hoang, 1998. "The Economics of Child Labor," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(3), pages 412-27, June.
  11. Sonia Bhalotra & Chris Heady, 2000. "Child farm labour: theory and evidence," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 6654, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  12. Basu, Kaushik, 2002. "A note on multiple general equilibria with child labor," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 74(3), pages 301-308, February.
  13. Swaminathan, Madhura, 1998. "Economic growth and the persistence of child labor: Evidence from an Indian city," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 26(8), pages 1513-1528, August.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Sarbajit Chaudhuri & Jayanta Kumar Dwibedi, 2005. "Trade Liberalization in Agriculture in Developed Nations and Incidence of Child Labour in a Developing Economy," International Trade 0510009, EconWPA.
  2. Sarbajit Chaudhuri, 2004. "Incidence of Child Labour, Free Education Policy, and Economic Liberalisation in a Developing Economy," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 43(1), pages 1-25.
  3. Chaudhuri, Sarbajit & Mukhopadhyay, Ujjaini, 2009. "Revisiting the Informal Sector: A General Equilibrium Approach," MPRA Paper 52135, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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