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Counting chickens when they hatch: The short-term effect of aid on growth

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  • Michael A. Clemens

    (Center for Global Development)

  • Steven Radelet

    (Center for Global Development)

  • Rikhil Bhavnani

    (Center for Global Development)

Abstract

Past research on aid and growth is flawed because it typically examines the impact of aggregate aid on growth over a short period, usually four years, while significant portions of aid are unlikely to affect growth in such a brief time. We divide aid into three categories: (1) emergency and humanitarian aid (likely to be negatively correlated with growth); (2) aid that affects growth only over the long term, if at all, such as aid to support democracy, the environment, health, or education (likely to have no relationship to growth over four years); and (3) aid that plausibly could stimulate growth in four years, including budget and balance of payments support, investments in infrastructure, and aid for productive sectors such as agriculture and industry. Our focus is on the third group, which accounts for about 45% of all aid flows. We find a positive, causal relationship between this 'short-impact' aid and economic growth (with diminishing returns) over a four-year period. The impact is large: at least two-to-three times larger than in studies using aggregate aid. Even at a conservatively high discount rate, at the mean a $1 increase in short-impact aid raises output (and income) by $8 in present value in the typical country. From a different perspective, we find that higher-than-average short-impact aid to sub-Saharan Africa raised per capita growth rates there by about one percentage point over the growth that would have been achieved by average aid flows. The results are highly statistically significant and stand up to a demanding array of tests, including various specifications, endogeneity structures, and treatment of influential observations. The basic result does not depend crucially on a recipient's level of income or quality of institutions and policies; we find that short-impact aid causes growth, on average, regardless of these characteristics. However, we find some evidence that the impact on growth is somewhat larger in countries with stronger institutions or longer life expectancies (better health). We also find a significant negative relationship between debt repayments and growth. We make no statement on, and do not attempt to measure, any additional long-run effects of aid; four-year panel regressions are not an appropriate tool to examine those relationships.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by EconWPA in its series International Finance with number 0407010.

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Length: 71 pages
Date of creation: 20 Jul 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpif:0407010

Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 71
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Web page: http://128.118.178.162

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Keywords: Foreign aid; development assistance; effectiveness; impact; growth; Burnside and Dollar; institutions; timing; interaction; effect; oda; humanitarian; short-term; short-run; long-term; long-run; disaggregated; disaggregation; disaggregate; budget support; social sector; cross-country; international;

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