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Rich and powerful? Subjective power and welfare in Russia

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  • Ravallion, Martin
  • Lokshin, Michael

Abstract

Does"empowerment"come hand-in-hand with higher economic welfare? In theory, higher income is likely to raise both power and welfare, but heterogeneity in other characteristics and household formation can either strengthen or weaken the relationship. Survey data on Russian adults indicate that higher individual and household incomes raise both self-rated power and welfare. The individual income effect is primarily direct, rather than through higher household income. There are diminishing returns to income, though income inequality emerges as only a minor factor reducing either aggregate power or welfare. At given income, the identified covariates have strikingly similar effects on power and welfare. There are some notable differences between men and women in perceived power.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by The World Bank in its series Policy Research Working Paper Series with number 2854.

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Date of creation: 30 Jun 2002
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Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:2854

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Keywords: Public Health Promotion; Anthropology; Gender and Social Development; Economic Theory&Research; Windpower; Economic Theory&Research; Anthropology; Gender and Social Development; Inequality; Windpower;

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References

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  1. Easterlin, Richard A., 1995. "Will raising the incomes of all increase the happiness of all?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 35-47, June.
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  5. Ravallion, Martin & Lokshin, Michael, 2001. "Identifying Welfare Effects from Subjective Questions," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 68(271), pages 335-57, August.
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  10. Ravallion, Martin & Lokshin, Michael, 2002. "Self-rated economic welfare in Russia," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 46(8), pages 1453-1473, September.
  11. Kapteyn, A.J., 1994. "The measurement of household cost functions: Revealed preference versus subjective measures," Open Access publications from Tilburg University urn:nbn:nl:ui:12-364386, Tilburg University.
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  13. Menno Pradhan & Martin Ravallion, 2000. "Measuring Poverty Using Qualitative Perceptions Of Consumption Adequacy," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 82(3), pages 462-471, August.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Broussard, Nzinga H & Dercon, Stefan & Somanathan, Rohini, 2012. "Aid and Agency in Africa: Explaining Food Disbursements Across Ethiopian Households, 1994-2004," CEPR Discussion Papers 8861, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Michael Lokshin & Nithin Umapathi & Stefano Paternostro, 2006. "Robustness of subjective welfare analysis in a poor developing country: Madagascar 2001," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(4), pages 559-591.
  3. Yonas Alem & Jonathan Colmer, 2013. "Don’t Worry, Be Happy: The Welfare Cost of Climate Variability – A Subjective Well-Being Approach," Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment Working Papers 118, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
  4. Grogan, Louise & Koka, Katerina, 2013. "Economic crises and wellbeing: Social norms and home production," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 241-258.
  5. Stillman, Steven & Gibson, John & McKenzie, David & Rohorua, Halahingano, 2012. "Miserable Migrants? Natural Experiment Evidence on International Migration and Objective and Subjective Well-Being," IZA Discussion Papers 6871, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  6. Ravallion, Martin, 2011. "On multidimensional indices of poverty," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5580, The World Bank.
  7. Alem, Yonas & Colmer, Jonathan, 2014. "Optimal Expectations and the Welfare Cost of Climate Variability," Discussion Papers dp-14-03-efd, Resources For the Future.
  8. Victoria Giarrizzo, 2009. "Subjective economic welfare: Beyond growth," Economía, Instituto de Investigaciones Económicas y Sociales (IIES). Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Sociales. Universidad de Los Andes. Mérida, Venezuela, vol. 34(28), pages 9-34, July-Dece.
  9. Nazim N. Habibov, 2011. "Self-perceived social stratification in low-income transitional countries: Examining the multi-country survey in Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 38(1), pages 5-22, December.
  10. Ekaterina Selezneva, 2010. "Surveying transitional experience and subjective well-being : Income, work, family," Working Papers 279, Institut für Ost- und Südosteuropaforschung (Institute for East and South-East European Studies).
  11. Leonardo Becchetti & Stefano Castriota & Nazaria Solferino, 2011. "Development Projects and Life Satisfaction: An Impact Study on Fair Trade Handicraft Producers," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 115-138, March.
  12. Nazim, Habibov & Elvin, Afandi, 2009. "Analysis of subjective wellbeing in low-income transitional countries: evidence from comparative national surveys in Armenia,Azerbaijan and Georgia," MPRA Paper 42720, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  13. Shmueli, Amir, 2008. "The demand for clinical information and for involvement in medical treatment decision making: An empirical examination in the general population," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 37(5), pages 1746-1755, October.
  14. Lee, Yong-Woo, 2012. "Asymmetric information and the demand for private health insurance in Korea," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 116(3), pages 284-287.
  15. Olena Nizalova, 2014. "Inequality in Total Returns to Work in Ukraine: Taking A Closer Look at Workplace (Dis)amenities," Discussion Papers 52, Kyiv School of Economics.
  16. Kristian Bolin & Daniel Hedblom & Anna Lindgren & Bjorn Lindgren, 2010. "Asymmetric Information and the Demand for Voluntary Health Insurance in Europe," NBER Working Papers 15689, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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