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A Political Economy Perspective of the Chinese Government Tactical Behavior

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  • Guggiola Gabriele

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    (University of Turin)

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    Abstract

    In the last decades China has experienced a sustained economic growth that has led to an exceptional increase in its income. Thanks to this performance, China is now one of the main actors on the world economic scene but, in spite of this economic opening, there has been no political opening and not all regions and social groups have equally benefited from the fast growth of the last decades. In the paper I will investigate the tactical behavior kept by the Chinese government in order to pursue economic growth and maintain the power through this development phase. The issue is important in order to the shed some light on the determinants of the Chinese government’s behavior and to provide some insight on possible future evolutions in Chinese political life.

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    File URL: http://www.unito.it/unitoWAR/ShowBinary/FSRepo/D031/Allegati/WP2009Dip/8_WP_Guggiola.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by University of Turin in its series Department of Economics and Statistics Cognetti de Martiis. Working Papers with number 200908.

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    Length: 25 pages
    Date of creation: Jul 2009
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:uto:dipeco:200908

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