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Wage Regulation and Training: The Impact of State Prevailing Wage Laws on Apprenticeship

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  • Cihan Bilginsoy

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Abstract

This paper analyzes the impact of the Prevailing Wage Laws (PWL) on the recruitment of apprentices, their completion and cancellation rates, and the minority share in apprenticeship programs. Statistical analysis shows that, controlling for the size of the trade, the supply of apprenticeship is higher in the PWL states. It also rises with the strength of the PWL. Secondly, apprentices complete graduation requirements at a slower rate in states without PWLs, indicating a lower efficiency in producing certified skilled workers. Finally, there is no evidence that PWLs serve as a means to exclude minorities from training for the skilled trades.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Utah, Department of Economics in its series Working Paper Series, Department of Economics, University of Utah with number 2003_08.

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Length: 28 pages
Date of creation: 2003
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published in The Economics of Prevailing Wage Laws, Hamid Azari-Rad, Peter Philips and Mark J. Prus (editors), pp. 149-168
Handle: RePEc:uta:papers:2003_08

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Keywords: Prevailing wage laws; apprenticeship training; construction; minorities;

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  1. Cihan Bilginsoy, 2003. "The hazards of training: Attrition and retention in construction industry apprenticeship programs," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 57(1), pages 54-67, October.
  2. Stevens, Margaret, 1994. "An Investment Model for the Supply of Training by Employers," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 104(424), pages 556-70, May.
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