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Regional growth in Japan

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  • Etsuro Shioji
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    Abstract

    I study the role of internal migration in income convergence across regions in Japan. Neoclassical theory predicts that migration should have been an important source of convergence. Regression results, however, suggest that migration did not contribute to convergence. I investigate the possibility that this discrepancy is explained by taking into account the effects of migration on population composition, especially on educational attainment. I propose an empirical approach to quantify this ``educational composition effect''. It is shown that, although this effect did slow down convergence, its magnitude was too small to account for the discrepancy between theory and empirics.

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    File URL: http://www.econ.upf.edu/docs/papers/downloads/138.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra in its series Economics Working Papers with number 138.

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    Date of creation: Jan 1992
    Date of revision: Oct 1995
    Handle: RePEc:upf:upfgen:138

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    Web page: http://www.econ.upf.edu/

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    1. Barro, Robert J & Sala-i-Martin, Xavier, 1992. "Convergence," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(2), pages 223-51, April.
    2. Casey B. Mulligan & Xavier Sala-i-Martin, 1994. "A labor-income-based measure of the value of human capital: An application to the States of the United States," Economics Working Papers 106, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Dec 1994.
    3. Ethier, Wilfred J, 1982. "National and International Returns to Scale in the Modern Theory of International Trade," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 72(3), pages 389-405, June.
    4. Katz, Lawrence F. & Revenga, Ana L., 1989. "Changes in the structure of wages: The United States vs Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 3(4), pages 522-553, December.
    5. Paul M Romer, 1999. "Increasing Returns and Long-Run Growth," Levine's Working Paper Archive 2232, David K. Levine.
    6. T. W. Swan, 1956. "ECONOMIC GROWTH and CAPITAL ACCUMULATION," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 32(2), pages 334-361, November.
    7. Olivier Jean Blanchard & Lawrence F. Katz, 1992. "Regional Evolutions," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 23(1), pages 1-76.
    8. George J. Borjas & Stephen G. Bronars & Stephen J. Trejo, 1992. "Self-Selection and Internal Migration in the United States," NBER Working Papers 4002, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Swan, Trevor W, 2002. "Economic Growth," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 78(243), pages 375-80, December.
    10. Cashin, P.A., 1993. "Economic Growth and Convergence Across the Seven Colonies of Australia: 1861-1991," Papers 688, Yale - Economic Growth Center.
    11. Greenwood, Michael J, 1975. "Research on Internal Migration in the United States: A Survey," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 13(2), pages 397-433, June.
    12. James E. Rauch, 1991. "Productivity Gains From Geographic Concentration of human Capital: Evidence From the Cities," NBER Working Papers 3905, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Robert J. Barro & Xavier Sala-i-Martin, 1991. "Convergence across States and Regions," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 22(1), pages 107-182.
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    Cited by:
    1. Carlo Devillanova & Walter Garcia Fontes, 1998. "Migration across Spanish provinces: Evidence from the social security records (1978-1992)," Economics Working Papers 318, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.

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