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Economic Growth and Convergence across the Seven Colonies of Australasia: 1861-1991

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  • Cashin, Paul

Abstract

Have the poor economies of Australasia grown faster than the rich ones? This question is analyzed for the seven colonies of Australasia for the period 1861-1991 and it is found that the levels of per-capita income across the colonies are converging to one another: the initially poor colonies have indeed grown faster. The cross-sectional dispersion of per-capita incomes also declined between 1861-1991, but most of this decline occurred in the prefederation 1861-1901 period as the extent of dispersion in 1991 is very close to that attained in 1901. Copyright 1995 by The Economic Society of Australia.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by The Economic Society of Australia in its journal The Economic Record.

Volume (Year): 71 (1995)
Issue (Month): 213 (June)
Pages: 132-44

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Handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:71:y:1995:i:213:p:132-44

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Cited by:
  1. DOBSON, Steve & RAMLOGAN, Carlyn & STROBL, Eric, 2003. "Why do rates of convergence differ ? A meta-regression analysis," CORE Discussion Papers 2003020, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
  2. Ian McLean, 2004. "Australian Economic Growth in Historical Perspective," Method and Hist of Econ Thought 0410003, EconWPA.
  3. Bertram, Geoffrey, 2004. "On the Convergence of Small Island Economies with Their Metropolitan Patrons," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 343-364, February.
  4. Gabriel Rodríguez, 2006. "The role of the interprovincial transfers in the ß: Further empirical evidence for Canada," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 33(1), pages 12-29, January.
  5. Arthur Grimes, 2004. "New Zealand: A Typical Australasian Ecomony?," Working Papers 04_11, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.
  6. Mahamat Hamit-Haggar, 2013. "A note on convergence across Canadian provinces: new insights from the club clustering algorithm," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer, vol. 50(2), pages 591-601, April.
  7. Andrew Henley, 2005. "On regional growth convergence in Great Britain," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(9), pages 1245-1260.
  8. Joseph DeJuan & Marc Tomljanovich, 2005. "Income convergence across Canadian provinces in the 20th century: Almost but not quite there," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer, vol. 39(3), pages 567-592, 09.
  9. Serge Coulombe, 2000. "New Evidence of Convergence Across Canadian Provinces: The Role of Urbanization," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(8), pages 713-725.
  10. Maria Abreu & Henri L.F. de Groot & Raymond J.G.M. Florax, 2005. "A Meta-Analysis of Beta-Convergence: The Legendary Two-Percent," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 05-001/3, Tinbergen Institute.
  11. Ward, William A. & Hite, James C., 1999. "Asset Fixity, Asset Specificity And Regional Economic Change: Hypothesis And Implications," Working Papers 18807, Clemson University, Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics.
  12. Maria Abreu & Henri L.F. de Groot & Raymond J.G.M. Florax, 2005. "A Meta-Analysis of Beta-Convergence: The Legendary Two-Percent," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 05-001/3, Tinbergen Institute.
  13. George Petrakos & Panagiotis Artelaris, 2009. "European Regional Convergence Revisited: A Weighted Least Squares Approach," Growth and Change, Gatton College of Business and Economics, University of Kentucky, vol. 40(2), pages 314-331.
  14. Etsuro Shioji, 1992. "Regional growth in Japan," Economics Working Papers 138, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Oct 1995.

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