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Growth with Equity in East Asia?

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  • Jomo K.S.
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    Abstract

    Rapid growth and structural change have reduced poverty in East Asian economies. Income inequality has been low in Korea and Taiwan, but has risen in recent years with economic liberalization. In the Southeast Asian economies of Thailand, Malaysia and Indonesia, poverty has declined, while income inequality trends have varied, rising most clearly in Thailand. With its strengthened (private) property rights, market liberalization and sustained rapid growth, China has also experienced increased inequality despite considerable poverty reduction. Hence, the common claim of egalitarian growth in East Asia may have been exaggerated, especially since the 1990s.

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    File URL: http://www.un.org/esa/desa/papers/2006/wp33_2006.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by United Nations, Department of Economics and Social Affairs in its series Working Papers with number 33.

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    Length: 54 pages
    Date of creation: Sep 2006
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:une:wpaper:33

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    Keywords: East Asia; China; Indonesia; Malaysia; Korea; Taiwan; Thailand; inequality; poverty;

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    1. Dani Rodrik, 1994. "Getting Interventions Right: How South Korea and Taiwan Grew Rich," NBER Working Papers 4964, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Emmanuel Skoufias & Asep Suryahadi, 2000. "Changes in Household Welfare, Poverty and Inequality During the Crisis," Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(2), pages 97-114.
    3. Alejandro Ramirez & Gustav Ranis, 1997. "Economic Growth and Human Development," Working Papers 787, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
    4. Ravallion, Martin & Chen, Shaohua, 2007. "China's (uneven) progress against poverty," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 82(1), pages 1-42, January.
    5. Shang-Jin Wei & Yi Wu, 2001. "Globalization and Inequality: Evidence from Within China," NBER Working Papers 8611, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Ranis, G. & Ramirez, A. & Stewart, F., 1997. "Economic Growth and Human Development," Papers 787, Yale - Economic Growth Center.
    7. Ragayah Haji Mat Zin, 2005. "Income Distribution in East Asian Developing Countries: recent trends," Asian-Pacific Economic Literature, Asia Pacific School of Economics and Government, The Australian National University, vol. 19, pages 36-54, November.
    8. Steven Radelet & Jeffrey Sachs, 1998. "The Onset of the East Asian Financial Crisis," NBER Working Papers 6680, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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