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(How) Do research and administrative duties affect university professors’ teaching?

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Abstract

We analyze the interaction between university professors’ teaching quality and their research and administrative activities. Our sample is a high-quality individual panel data set from a medium size public Spanish university. Although, researchers teach roughly 20% more than non-researchers, their teaching quality is also 20% higher. Over much of the relevant range, we find a nonlinear and positive effect of research output and teaching quantity on teaching quality. Instructors with no research are 5 times more likely than the rest to be among the worst teachers and up to two-thirds of the professors could improve their teaching by increasing research.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales, Instituto Complutense de Análisis Económico in its series Documentos de Trabajo del ICAE with number 2012-22.

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Length: 21 pages
Date of creation: Sep 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ucm:doicae:1222

Note: We would like to express our sincere thanks to the Universitat Jaume I for granting us access to the data. Without their careful and systematic collection of information on faculty duties and performance, this study would not have been possible. The authors want to thank Michael McAleer for his detailed comments and proofreading. Thanks are also due to Covadonga Gijón and Iñaki Iriondo for helpful suggestions. Financial support by the Spanish Ministry of Economics and Perspective (projects ECO2011-23634, ECO2008-06191 and ECO2011-27619), Junta de Andalucía (P07-SEJ-03155), and UJI-Bancaixa (project P1-1B2010-17) is gratefully acknowledged.
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Keywords: University professors'; Teaching quality; Public Spanish university; Research and administrative activities.;

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References

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  1. Lindbeck, Assar & Snower, Dennis, 2003. "The Firm as a Pool of Factor Complementarities," Seminar Papers, Stockholm University, Institute for International Economic Studies 725, Stockholm University, Institute for International Economic Studies.
  2. Beleche, Trinidad & Fairris, David & Marks, Mindy, 2012. "Do course evaluations truly reflect student learning? Evidence from an objectively graded post-test," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 709-719.
  3. Spiller, Pablo T & Zelner, Bennet A, 1997. "Product Complementarities, Capabilities and Governance: A Dynamic Transaction Cost Perspective," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 6(3), pages 561-94, September.
  4. Scott E. Carrell & James E. West, 2008. "Does Professor Quality Matter? Evidence from Random Assignment of Students to Professors," NBER Working Papers 14081, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Michael A. McPherson, 2006. "Determinants of How Students Evaluate Teachers," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(1), pages 3-20, January.
  6. Ewing, Andrew M., 2012. "Estimating the impact of relative expected grade on student evaluations of teachers," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 141-154.
  7. Ben R. Martin, 2012. "Are universities and university research under threat? Towards an evolutionary model of university speciation," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, Oxford University Press, vol. 36(3), pages 543-565.
  8. J. A. Hausman, 1976. "Specification Tests in Econometrics," Working papers 185, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  9. Paul Isely & Harinder Singh, 2005. "Do Higher Grades Lead to Favorable Student Evaluations?," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(1), pages 29-42, January.
  10. Bedard, Kelly & Kuhn, Peter, 2008. "Where class size really matters: Class size and student ratings of instructor effectiveness," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 253-265, June.
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Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Research and teaching are complements in terms of quality
    by Economic Logician in Economic Logic on 2012-11-28 15:48:00
  2. Academic research and teaching
    by René Böheim in Econ Tidbits on 2012-11-29 09:09:00

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