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Understanding Material Deprivation in Europe: A Multilevel Analysis

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  • Christopher T. Whelan

    (School of Sociology and Geary Institute, University College Dublin)

  • Bertrand Maître

    (Economic and Social Research Institute, Dublin)

Abstract

In this paper, taking advantage of the inclusion of a special module on material deprivation in EU-SILC 2009, we provide a comparative analysis of patterns of deprivation. Our analysis identifies six relatively distinct dimensions of deprivation with generally satisfactory overall levels of reliability and mean levels of reliability across counties. Multi-level analysis based on 28 European countries reveals systematic variation across countries in the relative importance of with and between country variation. The basic deprivation dimension is the sole dimension to display a graduated pattern of variation a across countries. It also reveals the highest correlations with national and household income, the remaining deprivation dimensions and economic stress. It comes closest to capturing an underlying dimension of generalized deprivation that can provide the basis for a comparative European analysis of exclusion from customary standards of living. A multilevel analysis revealed that a range of household and household reference person socio-economic factors were related to basic deprivation and controlling for contextual differences in such factors allowed us to account for substantial proportions of both within and between country variance. The addition of macro-economic factors relating to average levels of disposable income and income inequality contributed relatively little further in the way of explanatory power. Further analysis revealed the existence of a set of significant interactions between micro socio-economic attributes and country level gross national disposable income per capita. The impact of socio-economic differentiation was significantly greater where average income levels were lower. Or, in other words, the impact of the latter was greater for more disadvantaged socio-economic groups. Our analysis supports the suggestion that an emphasis on the primary role of income inequality to the neglect of differences in absolute levels of income may be misleading in important respects.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Geary Institute, University College Dublin in its series Working Papers with number 201205.

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Length: 29 pages
Date of creation: 21 Feb 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ucd:wpaper:201205

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Keywords: deprivation; economics; income; socio-economic differentiation; multi-level analysis;

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References

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  1. Nolan, Brian & Whelan, Christopher T., 2011. "Poverty and Deprivation in Europe," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199588435, September.
  2. Kenworthy, Lane, 2011. "Progress for the Poor," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199591527, September.
  3. Daniele Checchi & Jelle Visser & Herman G. van de Werfhorst, 2010. "Inequality and Union Membership: The Influence of Relative Earnings and Inequality Attitudes," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 48(1), pages 84-108, 03.
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Cited by:
  1. Christopher T. Whelan & Brian Nolan & Bertrand Maître, 2012. "Multidimensional Poverty Measurement in Europe: An Application of the Adjusted Headcount Approach," Working Papers 201211, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
  2. Wiemer Salverda & Christina Haas & Marloes Graaf-zijl & Bram Lancee & Natascha Notten & Tahnee Ooms, 2013. "GINI Country Report: Growing Inequalities and their Impacts in the Netherlands," GINI Country Reports netherlands, AIAS, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies.

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