Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Trends in Farm Income Mobility and Inequality in Ireland

Contents:

Author Info

  • Stephen Hynes

    ()
    (Rural Economy and Development Programme, Teagasc, Athenry, Co. Galway, Ireland)

  • Cathal O’Donoghue

    ()
    (Rural Economy and Development Programme, Teagasc, Athenry, Co. Galway, Ireland)

Abstract

Using eight years of data of the National Farm Survey (NFS) to analyse the farm earnings distribution in the period 1994 to 2001 we ask the question: is the Irish farming sector close to a society where individuals move up and down the earnings ladder over time or is it more similar to a society where individuals are stuck in the same step? We find that for those in the middle of the Irish farm earnings distribution the answer is close to the former but for those at either end of the Irish farm earnings distribution the answer is much closer to the latter. In getting to this answer we look at earnings inequality, characterise transition probabilities and model earnings dynamics as a purely stochastic process.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.agresearch.teagasc.ie/rerc/downloads/workingpapers/05wpre05.pdf
File Function: First version, 2005
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Rural Economy and Development Programme,Teagasc in its series Working Papers with number 0505.

as in new window
Length: 42 pages
Date of creation: 2005
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:tea:wpaper:0505

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Athenry, Co Galway
Phone: +353 91 845845
Fax: +353 91 845847
Web page: http://www.agresearch.teagasc.ie/rerc/
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Redmond, Gerry & Kattuman, Paul, 2001. "Employment Polarisation and Inequality in the UK and Hungary," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 25(4), pages 467-80, July.
  2. Brian Nolan & Bertrand Maitre, 2000. "A Comparative Perspective on Trends in Income Inequality in Ireland," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 31(4), pages 329-350.
  3. Jonathan Morduch & Terry Sicular, 1998. "Rethinking Inequality Decomposition, with Evidence from Rural China," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1831, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
  4. Sloane, P J & Theodossiou, I, 1996. "Earnings Mobility, Family Income and Low Pay," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 106(436), pages 657-66, May.
  5. Richard Dickens, 1997. "Caught In A Trap? Wage Mobility in Great Britain: 1975-94," CEP Discussion Papers dp0365, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  6. Mary Keeney, 2000. "The Distributional Impact of Direct Payments on Irish Farm Incomes," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(2), pages 252-265.
  7. Kalwij, Adriaan & Alessie, Rob, 2003. "Permanent and Transitory Wage Inequality of British Men, 1975-2001: Year, Age and Cohort Effects," IZA Discussion Papers 686, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:tea:wpaper:0505. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (John Lennon).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.