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Quantifying the Growth in Services: the Role of Skills, Scale, and Female Labor Supply

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  • Min Qiang (Kent) Zhao

    (Xiamen University)

  • Joseph Kaboski

    (University of Notre Dame)

  • Francisco Buera

    (University of California at Los Angeles)

Abstract

This paper quanties the role that increases in the demand for skill intensive goods and services, the ecient scale of production of services, and female labor supply have in explaining the growth of services. We extend the model in Buera and Kaboski (2012a,b) to a two-person household model, incorporating a joint household decision on home and market production into the model, and allow for skill and sectoral biased technology progress. The calibrated analysis shows that the channels emphasized in the theory are quantitatively important. The rising scale of services, the rising demand for skill-intensive output stemming from rising incomes, skill-biased technical change, and rising female labor supply all play important quantitative roles and together account for the majority of the growth of services. The extended model provides a direct link between female labor supply and the growth of service economy, which is shown to be important in the data.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Society for Economic Dynamics in its series 2013 Meeting Papers with number 277.

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Date of creation: 2013
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Handle: RePEc:red:sed013:277

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  1. Claudia Goldin, 2006. "The Quiet Revolution that Transformed Women's Employment, Education, and Family," NBER Working Papers 11953, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Casey B. Mulligan & Yona Rubinstein, 2008. "Selection, Investment, and Women's Relative Wages Over Time," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 123(3), pages 1061-1110, August.
  3. Lawrence F. Katz & Kevin M. Murphy, 1991. "Changes in Relative Wages, 1963-1987: Supply and Demand Factors," NBER Working Papers 3927, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Francisco J. Buera & Joseph Kaboski, 2008. "Scale and the origins of structural change," Working Paper Series WP-08-06, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
  5. Goldin, Claudia, 2006. "The Quiet Revolution That Transformed Women’s Employment, Education, and Family," Scholarly Articles 2943933, Harvard University Department of Economics.
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Cited by:
  1. L. Rachel Ngai & Barbara Petrongolo, 2014. "Gender Gaps and the Rise of the Service Economy," Discussion Papers 1404, Centre for Macroeconomics (CFM).

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