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The Relation between Government Expenditures and Economic Growth in Thailand

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  • Jiranyakul, Komain

Abstract

The notion that more government expenditures can stimulate growth is controversial. The causation between government expenditures and economic growth in Thailand is examined using the Granger causality test. There is no cointegration between government expenditures and economic growth. A unidirectional causality from government expenditures to economic growth exists. However, the causality from economic growth to government expenditures is not observed. Additionally, estimation results from the least square method with lagged variables of economic growth, government expenditures and money supply show the strong positive impact of government spending on economic growth during the period of investigation.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 46070.

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Date of creation: Jan 2007
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:46070

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Related research

Keywords: Economic growth; Government expenditures; Granger causality test; Least Square Estimation;

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References

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  1. Granger, C. W. J., 1980. "Testing for causality : A personal viewpoint," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 2(1), pages 329-352, May.
  2. David Aschauer, 1988. "Is public expenditure productive?," Staff Memoranda, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago 88-7, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
  3. Devarajan, Shantayanan & Swaroop, Vinaya & Heng-fu, Zou, 1996. "The composition of public expenditure and economic growth," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 37(2-3), pages 313-344, April.
  4. James G. MacKinnon, 1995. "Numerical Distribution Functions for Unit Root and Cointegration Tests," Working Papers, Queen's University, Department of Economics 918, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
  5. Barro, Robert J, 1990. "Government Spending in a Simple Model of Endogenous Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(5), pages S103-26, October.
  6. Abu-Bader, Suleiman & Abu-Qarn, Aamer, 2003. "Government Expenditures, Military Spending and Economic Growth: Causality Evidence from Egypt, Israel and Syria," MPRA Paper 1115, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  7. Johansen, Soren & Juselius, Katarina, 1990. "Maximum Likelihood Estimation and Inference on Cointegration--With Applications to the Demand for Money," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 52(2), pages 169-210, May.
  8. Dakurah, A. Henry & Davies, Stephen P. & Sampath, Rajan K., 2001. "Defense spending and economic growth in developing countries: A causality analysis," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 23(6), pages 651-658, August.
  9. Stpehen M. Miller & Frank S. Russek, 1993. "Fiscal Structures and Economic Growth: International Evidence," Macroeconomics, EconWPA 9309001, EconWPA, revised 23 Sep 1993.
  10. Granger, C W J, 1969. "Investigating Causal Relations by Econometric Models and Cross-Spectral Methods," Econometrica, Econometric Society, Econometric Society, vol. 37(3), pages 424-38, July.
  11. Holmes, James M & Hutton, Patricia A, 1990. "On the Causal Relationship between Government Expenditures and National Income," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 72(1), pages 87-95, February.
  12. Grier, Kevin B. & Tullock, Gordon, 1989. "An empirical analysis of cross-national economic growth, 1951-1980," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 24(2), pages 259-276, September.
  13. Ram, Rati, 1986. "Government Size and Economic Growth: A New Framework and Some Evidencefrom Cross-Section and Time-Series Data," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 76(1), pages 191-203, March.
  14. Engle, Robert F & Granger, Clive W J, 1987. "Co-integration and Error Correction: Representation, Estimation, and Testing," Econometrica, Econometric Society, Econometric Society, vol. 55(2), pages 251-76, March.
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Cited by:
  1. Abhijeet, Chandra, 2010. "Does Government Expenditure on Education Promote Economic Growth? An Econometric Analysis," MPRA Paper 25480, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Kucukkale, Yakup & Yamak, Rahmi, 2012. "Cointegration, causality and Wagner’s law with disaggregated data: evidence from Turkey, 1968-2004," MPRA Paper 36894, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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