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Open Source Software and Economic Growth: A Classical Division of Labor Perspective

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Author Info

  • Garzarelli, Giampaolo
  • Limam, Yasmina Reem
  • Thomassen, Bjørn

Abstract

The article turns to classical economic insights on the division of labor and to institutional reasoning to identify some costs and benefits of Open Source Software (OSS) and proprietary software production. It suggests that, thanks to its licenses, OSS favors market expansion more than proprietary software does by tapping into spontaneous work input. The spontaneous tapping leads to a division of labor that exhibits what the article calls redundant economies. By generating a circle of knowledge growth, reuse, and sharing, redundant economies lead to increasing returns, which are crucial for economic growth.

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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/3849/
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 3849.

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Date of creation: 22 Jun 2007
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:3849

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Related research

Keywords: Division of Labor; Extent of the Market; Increasing Returns; Institutions; Knowledge; Open Source Software; Redundant Economies;

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References

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Cited by:
  1. Giampaolo Garzarelli & Riccardo Fontanella, 2011. "Open Source Software Production, Spontaneous Input, and Organizational Learning," American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 70(4), pages 928-950, October.
  2. Engelhardt, Sebastian v. & Freytag, Andreas, 2013. "Institutions, culture, and open source," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 90-110.

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