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State export data: origin of movement vs. origin of production

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  • Cassey, Andrew

Abstract

The Origin of Movement (OM) series is unique data documenting the destination of state ex- ports. This data indicates the state an export begins its journey, not the production location (OP). Recent OM data has not been examined to determine if it represents OP. Here the collection, dissemination, and limitations of the OM data are described. Diagnostic tests asses how eectively the OM data represents OP. Results indicate the OM data are usable for OP, though there are idiosyncratic subsectors and states, and systematic dierences distinguishing the OM from OP.

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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/3352/
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 3352.

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Date of creation: 15 Oct 2006
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:3352

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Keywords: international trade; exports; states; origin of movement; origin of production;

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References

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  1. Cletus Coughlin & Howard Wall, 2003. "NAFTA and the changing pattern of state exports," Papers in Regional Science, Springer, Springer, vol. 82(4), pages 427-450, November.
  2. Robert C. Feenstra & John Romalis & Peter K. Schott, 2002. "U.S. Imports, Exports, and Tariff Data, 1989-2001," NBER Working Papers 9387, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Cletus C. Coughlin & Patricia S. Pollard, 2000. "State exports and the Asian crisis," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Jan, pages 3-14.
  4. Cletus C. Coughlin & Thomas B. Mandelbaum, 1991. "Measuring state exports: is there a better way?," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Jul, pages 65-79.
  5. Andrew B. Bernard & J. Bradford Jensen, 1994. "Exporters, Jobs and Wages in U.S. Manufacturing: 1976-1987," Working papers 95-7, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Andrew J. Cassey, 2012. "California'S Exports And The 2004 Overseas Office Closures," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 50(3), pages 641-651, 07.
  2. Tomasz Brodzicki & Stanislaw Uminski, 2013. "International trade relations of enterprises established in Poland's regions: gravity model panel estimation," Working Papers, Instytut Rozwoju, Institute for Development 1301, Instytut Rozwoju, Institute for Development.
  3. Fabien CANDAU & Elisa DIENESCH, 2013. "Globalization, Spatial Sorting and the Geography of Education," Working Papers 2012-2013_7, CATT - UPPA - Université de Pau et des Pays de l'Adour, revised Dec 2013.
  4. Cletus C. Coughlin & Dennis Novy, 2012. "Is the International Border Effect Larger than the Domestic Border Effect? Evidence from U.S. Trade," CEP Discussion Papers dp1162, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  5. Andrew J Cassey & Katherine N Schmeiser, 2013. "The agglomeration by destination of U.S. state exports," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 33(2), pages 1504-1510.
  6. Coughlin, Cletus C., 2014. "The great trade collapse and rebound: a state-by-state view," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, vol. 96(1), pages 13-33.
  7. Yilmazkuday, Hakan, 2009. "Is the Armington Elasticity Really Constant across Importers?," MPRA Paper 15954, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  8. Cristea, Anca D., 2011. "Buyer-seller relationships in international trade: Evidence from U.S. States' exports and business-class travel," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 84(2), pages 207-220, July.
  9. Andrew J. Cassey, 2010. "State Export Behavior and Barriers," Working Papers, School of Economic Sciences, Washington State University 2010-14, School of Economic Sciences, Washington State University.
  10. Hosny Zoabi & Philip Saure, 2010. "Effects of Trade on Female Labor Force Participation," DEGIT Conference Papers c015_015, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.

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