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Evaluating Innovative Health Programs: Lessons for Health Policy

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  • Squire, Lyn
  • Jones, Andrew M
  • Thomas, Ranjeeta

Abstract

The Global Development Network’s (GDN) project “Evaluating Innovative Health Programs” (EIHP), funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, seeks to inform policy on the effectiveness of health solutions that have the potential to improve health outcomes in developing countries. It evaluates the impact of nineteen programs from across developing and transition countries that focus on the health-related Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) of reducing child and maternal mortality, and halting and reversing the trend of communicable diseases such as HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases. The policy implications of the diverse set of interventions are distinguished between programs that involved earmarking resources, changing incentives, and developing innovative methods of health care delivery.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 29205.

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Date of creation: 2010
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:29205

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Keywords: Millennium Development Goals; child and maternal health; communicable diseases; impact evaluation; capacity building; Asia; Africa; Latin America;

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