Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Teacher training and HIV/AIDS prevention in West Africa: regression discontinuity design evidence from the Cameroon

Contents:

Author Info

  • Jean‐Louis Arcand
  • Eric Djimeu Wouabe

Abstract

We assess the impact on teenage childbearing as well as student knowledge, attitudes, and behavior of a typical HIV/AIDS teacher training program in the Cameroon. Applying a regression discontinuity design identification strategy based on the key administrative criterion that determined program deployment, we find that 15–17 year old girls in teacher training schools are between 7 and 10 percentage points less likely to have started childbearing, an objective proxy for the incidence of unprotected sex. They are also significantly more likely to have used a condom during their last sexual intercourse. For 12–13 year old girls, the likelihood of self-reported abstinence and condom use is also significantly higher in treated schools, while the likelihood of having multiple partners is significantly lower. Copyright (C) 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/hec.1643
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Health Economics.

Volume (Year): 19 (2010)
Issue (Month): S1 (September)
Pages: 36-54

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:19:y:2010:i:s1:p:36-54

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5749

Related research

Keywords: teacher training ; HIV/AIDS ; Cameroon ;

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Cameron, A. Colin & Gelbach, Jonah B. & Miller, Douglas L., 2011. "Robust Inference With Multiway Clustering," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, American Statistical Association, vol. 29(2), pages 238-249.
  2. David S. Lee & Thomas Lemieux, 2009. "Regression Discontinuity Designs in Economics," NBER Working Papers 14723, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Guido Imbens & Thomas Lemieux, 2007. "Regression Discontinuity Designs: A Guide to Practice," NBER Working Papers 13039, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Gallant, Melanie & Maticka-Tyndale, Eleanor, 2004. "School-based HIV prevention programmes for African youth," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 58(7), pages 1337-1351, April.
  5. Duflo, Esther & Dupas, Pascaline & Kremer, Michael & Sinei, Samuel, 2006. "Education and HIV/AIDS prevention : evidence from a randomized evaluation in Western Kenya," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4024, The World Bank.
  6. Hahn, Jinyong & Todd, Petra & Van der Klaauw, Wilbert, 2001. "Identification and Estimation of Treatment Effects with a Regression-Discontinuity Design," Econometrica, Econometric Society, Econometric Society, vol. 69(1), pages 201-09, January.
  7. Pascaline Dupas, 2009. "Do Teenagers Respond to HIV Risk Information? Evidence from a Field Experiment in Kenya," NBER Working Papers 14707, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Joshua D. Angrist & Victor Lavy, 1999. "Using Maimonides' Rule To Estimate The Effect Of Class Size On Scholastic Achievement," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, MIT Press, vol. 114(2), pages 533-575, May.
  9. David S. Lee & David Card, 2006. "Regression Discontinuity Inference with Specification Error," NBER Technical Working Papers, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc 0322, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Michael Rosenblum & Nicholas P. Jewell & Mark van der Laan & Stephen Shiboski & Ariane van der Straten & Nancy Padian, 2009. "Analysing direct effects in randomized trials with secondary interventions: an application to human immunodeficiency virus prevention trials," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 172(2), pages 443-465.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Steven F. Koch & Jeffrey S. Racine, 2013. "Health Care Facility Choice and User Fee Abolition: Regression Discontinuity in a Multinomial Choice Setting," Department of Economics Working Papers 2013-14, McMaster University.
  2. Squire, Lyn & Jones, Andrew M & Thomas, Ranjeeta, 2010. "Evaluating Innovative Health Programs: Lessons for Health Policy," MPRA Paper 29205, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Clémentine Garrouste & Jérôme Le & Eric Maurin, 2011. "The choice of detecting Down syndrome: does money matter?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(9), pages 1073-1089, 09.
  4. Thomas, Ranjeeta & Jones, Andrew M & Squire, Lyn, 2010. "Methods for Evaluating Innovative Health Programs (EIHP): A Multi-Country Study," MPRA Paper 29402, University Library of Munich, Germany.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:19:y:2010:i:s1:p:36-54. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.