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Impact Of Sibship Size, Birth Order, And Sex Composition On School Enrollment In Urban Turkey

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  • Kırdar, Murat G.
  • Dayıoğlu, Meltem
  • Tansel, Aysıt

Abstract

This paper investigates the effects of sibship size, birth order and sibling sex composition on children’s school enrollment in urban Turkey. Moreover, we examine how the effects of these variables vary by household income and the gender of the children. We utilize an instrumental variables estimation method in order to address parents’ joint fertility and schooling decisions where we use twin-births as instruments. In addition, we generate careful measures for birth order and siblings’ sex composition in order to purge the impact of these variables from that of sibship size. We find no causal impact of sibship size on school enrollment. However, there is evidence for a parabolic impact of birth-order where middle-born children fare worse. The parabolic impact of birth order is more pronounced in poorer families. Sex composition of siblings matters only for female children. A higher fraction of older male siblings decreases the enrollment probability of female children in poorer households. In the wealthiest families, on the contrary, a higher fraction of male siblings increases the enrollment probability of female children. The finding that birth order and sibling sex composition matters more for poorer households suggests that scarce financial resources are the underlying cause of the sibling composition effects.

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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 2755.

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Date of creation: Apr 2007
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:2755

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Keywords: Educational Attainment; Sibship Size; Birth Order; Sibling Sex Composition; Instrumental Variables;

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  1. Dalton Conley & Rebecca Glauber, 2005. "Parental Educational Investment and Children's Academic Risk: Estimates of the Impact of Sibship Size and Birth Order from Exogenous Variations in Fertility," NBER Working Papers 11302, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Mette Ejrnæs & Claus C. Pörtner, 2004. "Birth Order and the Intrahousehold Allocation of Time and Education," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 86(4), pages 1008-1019, November.
  3. Gary-Bobo, Robert J. & Picard, Natalie & Prieto, Ana, 2006. "Birth Order and Sibship Sex Composition as Instruments in the Study of Education and Earnings," CEPR Discussion Papers, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers 5514, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
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Cited by:
  1. Zeng, Wu & Undurraga, Eduardo A. & Nyberg, Colleen & Eisenberg, Dan T.A. & Parida, Sabita & Zycherman, Ariela & Magvanjav, Oyunbileg & Reyes-García, Victoria & Tanner, Susan & Godoy, Ricardo, 2013. "Sibling composition during childhood and adult blood pressure among native Amazonians in Bolivia," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 11(3), pages 391-400.
  2. Park, Cheolsung & Chung, Wankyo, 2012. "Sibship Size, Birth Order, and Children's Education Indeveloping Countries : Evidence from Bangladesh," Hitotsubashi Journal of Economics, Hitotsubashi University, Hitotsubashi University, vol. 53(1), pages 1-23, June.
  3. Jones, Kelly M., 2014. "Growing up together: Cohort composition and child investment," MPRA Paper 55182, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Yamamura, Eiji, 2012. "Effects of siblings and birth order on income redistribution preferences," MPRA Paper 38658, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Kirdar, Murat G. & Dayioglu, Meltem & Koc, Ismet, 2012. "Does longer compulsory education equalize educational attainment by gender, ethnicity, and socioeconomic background?," MPRA Paper 39995, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  6. Zeng, Wu & Undurraga, Eduardo A. & Eisenberg, Dan T.A. & Rubio-Jovel, Karla & Reyes-García, Victoria & Godoy, Ricardo, 2012. "Sibling composition and child educational attainment: Evidence from native Amazonians in Bolivia," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 31(6), pages 1017-1027.
  7. Dang, Hai-Anh & Rogers, Halsey, 2013. "The decision to invest in child quality over quantity : household size and household investment in education in Vietnam," Policy Research Working Paper Series, The World Bank 6487, The World Bank.

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