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Decomposing Productivity Growth in the U.S. Computer Industry

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  • Hyunbae Chun
  • M. Ishaq Nadiri

Abstract

In this paper, we examine the sources of the productivity growth in the U.S. computer industry from 1978 to 1999. We estimate a joint production model of output quantity and quality that distinguishes two types of technological changes: process and product innovations. Based on the estimation results, we decompose total factor productivity (TFP) growth rate into the contributions of process and product innovations and scale economies. The results show that product innovation associated with better quality accounts for about 30 percent of the TFP growth in the computer industry. Furthermore, we find that the TFP acceleration in the computer industry in the late 1990s is mainly derived from a rapid increase in product innovation.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 9267.

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Date of creation: Oct 2002
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Publication status: published as Hyunbae Chun & M. Ishaq Nadiri, 2008. "Decomposing Productivity Growth in the U.S. Computer Industry," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 90(1), pages 174-180, November.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:9267

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  1. Davis, Peter, 2000. "Empirical models of demand for differentiated products," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 44(4-6), pages 993-1005, May.
  2. Darren Filson, 2001. "The Nature and Effects of Technological Change over the Industry Life Cycle," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 4(2), pages 460-494, July.
  3. Bart Hobijn, 2001. "Is equipment price deflation a statistical artifact?," Staff Reports 139, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  4. Gort, Michael & Klepper, Steven, 1982. "Time Paths in the Diffusion of Product Innovations," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 92(367), pages 630-53, September.
  5. Irwin, Douglas A & Klenow, Peter J, 1994. "Learning-by-Doing Spillovers in the Semiconductor Industry," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 102(6), pages 1200-1227, December.
  6. Dale W. Jorgenson & Kevin J. Stiroh, 2000. "Raising the Speed Limit: US Economic Growth in the Information Age," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 261, OECD Publishing.
  7. Timothy F. Bresnahan & Shane Greenstein, 1997. "Technological Competition and the Structure of the Computer Industry," Working Papers 97028, Stanford University, Department of Economics.
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Cited by:
  1. Subal Kumbhakar & Kai Sun, 2012. "Estimation of TFP growth: a semiparametric smooth coefficient approach," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 43(1), pages 1-24, August.
  2. Mirko Draca & Raffaella Sadun & John Van Reenen, 2006. "Productivity and ICT: A Review of the Evidence," CEP Discussion Papers dp0749, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  3. Rodrigo Cifuentes & Jorge Desormeaux, 2005. "Monetary policy and financial integration: the case of Chile," BIS Papers chapters, in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Globalisation and monetary policy in emerging markets, volume 23, pages 109-23 Bank for International Settlements.
  4. Geuna, Aldo & Nesta, Lionel J.J., 2006. "University patenting and its effects on academic research: The emerging European evidence," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(6), pages 790-807, July.
  5. Khayyat, Nabaz T. & Lee, Jongsu & Lee, Jeong-Dong, 2014. "How ICT Investment Influences Energy Demand in South Korea and Japan?," MPRA Paper 55454, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  6. Hyunbae Chun & Jung-Wook Kim & Randall Morck & Bernard Yeung, 2007. "Creative Destruction and Firm-Specific Performance Heterogeneity," NBER Working Papers 13011, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Hyunbae Chun & Jung-Wook Kim & Randall Morck, 2011. "Varying Heterogeneity among U.S. Firms: Facts and Implications," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 93(3), pages 1034-1052, August.
  8. BEN YOUSSEF, Adel & M'HENNI, Hatem, 2003. "Les effets des technologies de l'information et de communication sur la croissance économique; le cas de la Tunisie
    [ICT contribution to growth; the case of tunisia]
    ," MPRA Paper 27537, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  9. Hyunbae Chun & Jung-Wook Kim & Jason Lee & Randall Morck, 2004. "Patterns of Comovement: The Role of Information Technology in the U.S. Economy," NBER Working Papers 10937, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Catherine Mann, 2011. "Information Technology, Globalization, and Growth: Role for Scale Economies, Terms of Trade, and Variety," Working Papers 27, Brandeis University, Department of Economics and International Businesss School.

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