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Household Responses to Public Home Care Programs

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  • Peter C. Coyte
  • Mark Stabile

Abstract

A choice-theoretic model of household decision-making with respect to care-giving time allocations and the use of publicly and privately financed home care services is proposed. Predictions concerning the effect of increased availability of publicly financed home care services on home care utilization, informal care-giving, and health status are derived. These predictions are assessed through use of Canadian inter-provincial survey data on home care use and care-giving that are matched with data on home care funding for the period 1992 to 1998. Increased availability of publicly financed home care is associated with an increase in its utilization and a decline in informal care-giving, with this effect more pronounced among lower income Canadians. While self-reported health status was positively correlated with the increased availability of publicly financed home care, the perceived need for home care was invariant to this change.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 8523.

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Date of creation: Oct 2001
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Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:8523

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  1. Ettner, Susan L, 1994. "The Effect of the Medicaid Home Care Benefit on Long-Term Care Choices of the Elderly," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 32(1), pages 103-27, January.
  2. Hoerger, Thomas J. & Picone, Gabriel & Sloan, Frank, 1995. "Public Subsidies, Private Provision of Care, and Living Arrangements of the Elderly," Working Papers 95-22, Duke University, Department of Economics.
  3. Alan M. Garber, 1989. "Long-Term Care, Wealth, and Health of the Disabled Elderly Living in the Community," NBER Chapters, in: The Economics of Aging, pages 255-278 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. David M. Cutler & Louise M. Sheiner, 1993. "Policy Options for Long-Term Care," NBER Working Papers 4302, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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Cited by:
  1. Fontaine, Roméo, 2011. "The effect of public subsidies for formal care on the care provision for disabled elderly people in France," Economics Papers from University Paris Dauphine 123456789/9268, Paris Dauphine University.
  2. Michelle Sovinsky Goeree & Bridget Hiedemann & Steven Stern, 2012. "Will you still want me tomorrow? The dynamics of families' long-term care arrangements," ECON - Working Papers 088, Department of Economics - University of Zurich.
  3. Goltz, Andreas & Arnault, Louis, 2013. "How would informal caregivers react to an increase in formal home-care use by their elderly dependent relatives in France?," Economics Papers from University Paris Dauphine 123456789/11722, Paris Dauphine University.
  4. Marcén, Miriam & Molina, José Alberto, 2009. "Informal Caring-Time and Caregiver Satisfaction," MPRA Paper 17739, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Nuscheler, Robert & Roeder, Kerstin, 2013. "The political economy of long-term care," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 154-173.
  6. Michelle Sovinsky & Steven Stern, 2013. "Dynamic modelling of long-term care decisions," ECON - Working Papers 113, Department of Economics - University of Zurich.
  7. Lilly, Meredith B. & Laporte, Audrey & Coyte, Peter C., 2010. "Do they care too much to work? The influence of caregiving intensity on the labour force participation of unpaid caregivers in Canada," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 895-903, December.
  8. Melanie Arntz & Stephan L. Thomsen, 2010. "Are Personal Budgets a Financially Sound Reform Option for the German Long-Term Care Insurance?," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), Justus-Liebig University Giessen, Department of Statistics and Economics, vol. 230(4), pages 378-402, August.
  9. Sergi Jiménez-Martín & Cristina Vilaplana Prieto, 2013. "Do Spanish informal caregivers come to the rescue of dependent people with formal care unmet needs?," Economics Working Papers 1366, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
  10. Bridget Hiedemann & Michelle Sovinsky & Steven Stern, 2011. "Will You Still Want Me Tomorrow? The Dynamics of Families’ Long-Term Care Arrangements," Working Papers 2012-017, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
  11. Sergi Jiménez-Martín & Cristina Prieto, 2012. "The trade-off between formal and informal care in Spain," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer, vol. 13(4), pages 461-490, August.
  12. Arnaulty, Louis & Goltzy, Andreas, 2012. "A micro-econometric analysis of care for the dependent elderly living at home in France: Is there a crowding-out effect of informal caregivers when an elderly dependent receives professional home care," Economics Papers from University Paris Dauphine 123456789/10723, Paris Dauphine University.
  13. Irene Staveren, 2010. "Home Care Reform in the Netherlands: Impacts on Unpaid Care in Rotterdam," Forum for Social Economics, Springer, vol. 39(1), pages 13-21, April.
  14. Orsini, Chiara, 2010. "Changing the way the elderly live: Evidence from the home health care market in the United States," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(1-2), pages 142-152, February.
  15. Arntz, Melanie & Thomsen, Stephan L., 2008. "Reforming Home Care Provision in Germany: Evidence from a Social Experiment," ZEW Discussion Papers 08-114, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
  16. Bonsang, Eric, 2009. "Does informal care from children to their elderly parents substitute for formal care in Europe?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 143-154, January.
  17. Michelle Sovinsky & Steven Stern, 2012. "Dynamic Modelling of Long-Term Care Decisions," Working Papers 2012-019, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
  18. Kuhn, Michael & Nuscheler, Robert, 2011. "Optimal public provision of nursing homes and the role of information," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 795-810, July.
  19. Haizhen Mou & Stanley L. Winer, 2010. "Fiscal Incidence When Both Individual Welfare and Family Structure Matter: The Case of Subsidization of Home -care for the Elderly," ICER Working Papers 15-2010, ICER - International Centre for Economic Research.
  20. Haizhen Mou & Stanley L. Winer, 2012. "Fiscal Incidence when both Individual Welfare and Family Structure Matter: The Case of Subsidization of Home-Care for the Elderly," CESifo Working Paper Series 3731, CESifo Group Munich.

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