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Real Exchange Rate Misalignments and Growth

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  • Ofair Razin
  • Susan M. Collins
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    Abstract

    Real exchange rate (RER) misalignment is now a standard concept in international macroeconomic theory and policy. However, there is neither a consensus indicator of misalignment, nor an agreed upon methodology for constructing such an indicator. This paper constructs an indicator of RER misalignment for a large sample of developed and developing countries. This indicator is based on a well-structured but simple extension of an IS-LM model of an open economy. The paper then uses regression analysis to explore whether RER misalignments are related to country growth experiences. Interestingly the work finds that there are important non-linearities in the relationship. Only very high over-valuations" appear to be associated with slower economic growth, while moderate to high (but not very high) under-valuations appear to be associated with more rapid economic growth.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 6174.

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    Date of creation: Sep 1997
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    Publication status: published as Razin, Assaf and Efraim Sadka (eds.) International Economic Integration: Public Economics Perspectives. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999.
    Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:6174

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    1. Bosworth, B. & Collins, S.M. & Chen, Y.C., 1995. "Accounting for Differences in Economic Growth," Papers, Brookings Institution - Working Papers 115, Brookings Institution - Working Papers.
    2. Ghura, Dhaneshwar & Grennes, Thomas J., 1993. "The real exchange rate and macroeconomic performance in Sub-Saharan Africa," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 42(1), pages 155-174, October.
    3. repec:fth:inadeb:310 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Leahy, John V & Whited, Toni M, 1996. "The Effect of Uncertainty on Investment: Some Stylized Facts," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 28(1), pages 64-83, February.
    5. Michael Gavin & Ricardo Hausmann & Leonardo Leiderman, 1995. "The Macroeconomics of Capital Flows to Latin America: Experience and Policy Issues," IDB Publications 5821, Inter-American Development Bank.
    6. John Williamson, 1994. "Estimating Equilibrium Exchange Rates," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 17, July.
    7. Barro, R.J., 1989. "Economic Growth In A Cross Section Of Countries," RCER Working Papers 201, University of Rochester - Center for Economic Research (RCER).
    8. Peter B. Clark & Steven A. Symansky & Tamim Bayoumi & Mark P. Taylor, 1994. "Robustness of Equilibrium Exchange Rate Calculations to Alternative Assumptions and Methodologies," IMF Working Papers 94/17, International Monetary Fund.
    9. Susan M. Collins & Barry P. Bosworth, 1996. "Economic Growth in East Asia: Accumulation versus Assimilation," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 27(2), pages 135-204.
    10. Michael Gavin & Ricardo Hausmann & Leonardo Leiderman, 1995. "Macroeconomics of Capital Flows to Latin America: Experience and Policy Issues," Research Department Publications, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department 4012, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
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