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A Guide to Target Zones

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Author Info

  • Jacob A. Frenkel
  • Morris Goldstein

Abstract

This paper identifies key issues surrounding the advisability and practicality of adopting "target zones" for the exchange rates of major currencies. Pour fundamental questions concerning the definition of and the rationale for target zones are addressed: first, what is generally meant by a "target zone" approach to exchange rate management and how can "hard" and "soft" versions of this approach be defined; second, what are the perceived deficiencies in the existing exchange rate system of managed floating which motivate the call for the adoption of target zones; third, how might target zones remedy these deficiencies; and fourth, what factors are behind much of the skepticism over and opposition to target zones? In addition, the paper deals with a series of operational questions of a more technical nature that weigh heavily on the practicality of implementing a target zone approach. The issues discussed include the following: how would the target zones be calculated; what currencies would be included in the system of target zones; how wide should the target zones be and how frequently should they be revised; and what policy instruments would be employed to keep actual exchange rates within the target zones, and with what consequences for other policy objectives? The purpose of the paper is not to make the case either for or against the adoption of target zones. Rather, the intention is to raise and discuss factors that should be considered in any serious discussion of the topic.

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File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w2113.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 2113.

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Date of creation: Dec 1986
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Publication status: published as Frenkel, Jacob A. and Morris Goldstein. "A Guide to Target Zones." International Monetary Fund, Staff Papers, Vol. 33, No. 4, (December 1986), pp. 633-673.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:2113

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Cited by:
  1. Dominquez, Kathryn M. & Kenen, Peter B., 1992. "Intramarginal intervention in the EMS and the target-zone model of exchange-rate behavior," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 36(8), pages 1523-1532, December.
  2. Yu-Fu Chen & Michael Funke & Nicole Glanemann, 2014. "The Signalling Channel of Central Bank Interventions: Modelling the Yen/US Dollar Exchange Rate," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 25(2), pages 311-336, April.
  3. Forbes, C.S. & Kofman, P., 2000. "Bayesian Soft Target Zones," Monash Econometrics and Business Statistics Working Papers 4/00, Monash University, Department of Econometrics and Business Statistics.
  4. Nikolaos Giannellis & Athanasios Papadopoulos, 2009. "What causes exchange rate volatility? Evidence from selected EMU members and candidates for EMU membership countries," Working Papers 1004, University of Crete, Department of Economics, revised 08 Jan 2010.

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