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Regionalization, Changes in Home Bias, and the Growth of World Trade

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  • John Whalley
  • Xian Xin

Abstract

In this paper we use numerical modeling methods to quantitatively assess the impacts of changes in home bias within regions on the growth of world trade among major blocs over the last three decades. Existing work focuses on the impacts of trade barrier, transport cost and income changes on trade growth, rather than preferences. Removing changes in home bias over the last three decades from our global general equilibrium model reduces world trade by 27% compared to actual world trade in 2004 in our central case scenario. These results support the view that world trade among major blocs has became more regionalized rather than internationalized which we suggest may be due to a proliferation of free trade agreements. We calibrate a simple global trade model of inter bloc trade to both 1975 and 2004 data and substitute different calibrated parameters from the two data sets between model parameterizations. Our results suggest that if changes over time in home bias involving different regionally sourced goods in a multi-region multi product model are removed, substantial effects follow for the growth of world trade in the last three decades. Home bias changes in developed and developing economies reduce world trade by 8% and 19% respectively, suggesting that regionalization is more pronounced in developing country trade. Our results also indicate that income growth, income convergence, and falling trade costs explain 76%, 4%, and 7% respectively of the growth of world trade over the last three decades.

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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 13023.

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Date of creation: Apr 2007
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Publication status: published as "Regionalization, Changes in Home Bias, and the Growth of World Trade" (with Xin Xian). Journal of Policy Modeling, forthcoming.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:13023

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  1. Robert C. Feenstra, . "Integration Of Trade And Disintegration Of Production In The Global Economy," Department of Economics 98-06, California Davis - Department of Economics.
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  5. John Whalley & Xian Xin, 2006. "Home and Regional Biases and Border Effects in Armington Type Models," NBER Working Papers 12439, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Carolyn L. Evans & James Harrigan, 2003. "Distance, Time, and Specialization," NBER Working Papers 9729, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Helpman, Elhanan, 1987. "Imperfect competition and international trade: Evidence from fourteen industrial countries," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 1(1), pages 62-81, March.
  8. Baier, Scott L. & Bergstrand, Jeffrey H., 2001. "The growth of world trade: tariffs, transport costs, and income similarity," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(1), pages 1-27, February.
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Cited by:
  1. Jacks, David S. & Meissner, Christopher M. & Novy, Dennis, 2011. "Trade booms, trade busts, and trade costs," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 83(2), pages 185-201, March.
  2. M. Del Gatto & F. Di Mauro & J. Gruber & B. Mandel, 2012. "The “Revealed” Competitiveness of U.S. Exports," Working Paper CRENoS 201232, Centre for North South Economic Research, University of Cagliari and Sassari, Sardinia.
  3. Novy, Dennis, 2008. "Gravity Redux : Measuring International Trade Costs with Panel Data," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 861, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
  4. repec:cge:warwcg:33 is not listed on IDEAS
  5. William F. Lincoln & Andrew H. McCallum, 2011. "Entry Costs & Increasing Trade," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series wp1024, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  6. Jacks, David S. & Meissner, Christopher M. & Novy, Dennis, 2010. "Trade costs in the first wave of globalization," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 47(2), pages 127-141, April.
  7. Lincoln, William F. & McCallum, Andrew H., 2011. "Entry Costs and Increasing Trade," Working Papers 619, Research Seminar in International Economics, University of Michigan.

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