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Shrinking Regions in a Shrinking Country: The Geography of Population Decline in Lithuania 2001-2011

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Author Info

  • Ubarevičienė, Rūta

    ()
    (Lithuanian Social Research Centre)

  • van Ham, Maarten

    ()
    (Delft University of Technology)

  • Burneika, Donatas

    ()
    (Lithuanian Social Research Centre)

Abstract

Shrinking populations have been gaining increasing attention, especially in post-socialist East and Central European countries. While most studies focus on the population decline of capital cities and their regions, much less is known about the spatial dimension of population decline on the national level. Lithuania is one of the countries which have experienced very high levels of population decline in the last decades. This study uses Lithuanian Census data from the years 2001 and 2011 to get insight into the geography of population change for the whole country. The results show a sharp population decline in Lithuania of 17.2% between 1989 and 2011, with the decrease being more intense during the second decade of the period. The population dropped in most areas, including the main cities, but increased in the regions surrounding these cities. The predictive models show a clear geographical dimension of population decline, but also reveal that population composition and investments play a role in the process of decline.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 8026.

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Length: 26 pages
Date of creation: Mar 2014
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp8026

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Keywords: post-socialist transition; shrinking regions; population decline; suburbanization; Lithuania;

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  6. Thorsten Wiechmann & Karina M. Pallagst, 2012. "Urban shrinkage in Germany and the USA: A Comparison of Transformation Patterns and Local Strategies," International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Wiley Blackwell, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 36(2), pages 261-280, 03.
  7. Niedomysl, Thomas & Amcoff, Jan, 2010. "Is there a hidden potential for rural population growth in Sweden?," Arbetsrapport, Institute for Futures Studies 2010:2, Institute for Futures Studies.
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