Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Occupational Mobility and Living in Deprived Neighbourhoods: Housing Tenure Differences in 'Neighbourhood Effects'

Contents:

Author Info

  • van Ham, Maarten

    ()
    (Delft University of Technology)

  • Manley, David

    ()
    (University of Bristol)

Abstract

The literature on neighbourhood effects suggests that the lack of social mobility of some groups has a spatial dimension. It is thought that those living in the most deprived neighbourhoods are the least likely to achieve upward mobility because of a range of negative neighbourhood effects. Most studies investigating such effects only identify correlations between individual outcomes and their residential environment and do not take into account that selection into neighbourhoods is a non-random mechanism. This paper investigates occupational mobility between 1991 and 2001 for those who were employed in Scotland in 1991 by using unique longitudinal data from Scottish Longitudinal Study (SLS). We add to the existing literature by investigating neighbourhood effects on occupational mobility separately for social renters, private renters and home owners. We find that 'neighbourhood effects' are strongest for home owners, which is an unexpected finding. We argue that the correlation between characteristics of the residential environment and occupational mobility can be explained by selection effects: homeowners with the least resources, who are least likely to experience upward mobility, are also most likely to sort into the most deprived neighbourhoods. Social housing tenants experience less selective sorting across neighbourhoods as other than market forces are responsible for the neighbourhood sorting mechanism.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://ftp.iza.org/dp7815.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 7815.

as in new window
Length: 18 pages
Date of creation: Dec 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp7815

Contact details of provider:
Postal: IZA, P.O. Box 7240, D-53072 Bonn, Germany
Phone: +49 228 3894 223
Fax: +49 228 3894 180
Web page: http://www.iza.org

Order Information:
Postal: IZA, Margard Ody, P.O. Box 7240, D-53072 Bonn, Germany
Email:

Related research

Keywords: neighbourhood effects; occupational mobility; deprivation; selective mobility; longitudinal data;

Find related papers by JEL classification:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Bergström, Lina & van Ham, Maarten & Manley, David, 2010. "Neighbourhood Choice and Neighbourhood Reproduction," IZA Discussion Papers 5238, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Klaauw, B. van der & Ours, J.C. van, 2003. "From welfare to work: Does the neighbourhood matter?," Open Access publications from Tilburg University urn:nbn:nl:ui:12-117058, Tilburg University.
  3. Schelling, Thomas C, 1969. "Models of Segregation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 59(2), pages 488-93, May.
  4. Manski, Charles F, 1993. "Identification of Endogenous Social Effects: The Reflection Problem," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 60(3), pages 531-42, July.
  5. Maarten van Ham & David Manley, 2010. "The effect of neighbourhood housing tenure mix on labour market outcomes: a longitudinal investigation of neighbourhood effects," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, Oxford University Press, vol. 10(2), pages 257-282, March.
  6. Anne Bolster & Simon Burgess & Ron Johnston & Kelvyn Jones & Carol Propper & Rebecca Sarker, 2004. "Neighbourhoods, Households and Income Dynamics: A Semi-Parametric Investigation of Neighbourhood Effects," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 04/106, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
  7. van der Klaauw, Bas & van Ours, Jan C., 2003. "From welfare to work: does the neighborhood matter?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 87(5-6), pages 957-985, May.
  8. Maarten van Ham & Pieter Hooimeijer & Clara H. Mulder, 2001. "Urban Form and Job Access: Disparate Realities in the Randstad," Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie, Royal Dutch Geographical Society KNAG, vol. 92(2), pages 231-246, 05.
  9. William Clark, 1992. "Residential preferences and residential choices in a multiethnic context," Demography, Springer, Springer, vol. 29(3), pages 451-466, August.
  10. David Manley & Maarten van Ham, 2011. "Choice-based Letting, Ethnicity and Segregation in England," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 48(14), pages 3125-3143, November.
  11. W. Clark, 1991. "Residential preferences and neighborhood racial segregation: A test of the schelling segregation model," Demography, Springer, Springer, vol. 28(1), pages 1-19, February.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp7815. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Mark Fallak).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.