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When It's (Mostly) the Taking Part that Counts: The Post-Application Consequences of Employment Tribunal Claims

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  • Drinkwater, Stephen

    ()
    (Swansea University)

  • Latreille, Paul L.

    ()
    (University of Sheffield)

  • Knight, Ben

    ()
    (University of Warwick)

Abstract

This paper uses the 2003 Survey of Employment Tribunal Applications to examine the post-application employment consequences for individuals registering complaints to Employment Tribunals following dismissal or redundancy. In examining this issue, we consider a number of pieces of evidence: (i) the probability of finding another job; (ii) the time taken to get a new job and (iii) the pay/status of the new job. It is found that age plays a significant role in aspects (i) and (iii), whilst those who previously held managerial positions generally took longest to get a new job and found it most difficult to achieve a similar level of pay/status in their current jobs. Long-term health problems/disability is associated with significantly worse outcomes on all three measures. Respondents whose cases were dismissed by the tribunals without hearings fared worst in terms of obtaining a new job and the time it took to do so compared with other outcomes. There were, however, fewer differences by outcome in the relative pay/status of the claimant’s current job.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 3629.

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Length: 44 pages
Date of creation: Aug 2008
Date of revision:
Publication status: published as 'The post-application labour market consequences of employment tribunal claims' in: Human Resource Management Journal, 2011, 21 (2), 171-189
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp3629

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Keywords: job search; job separations; employment tribunals;

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