Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

The evolution of post-communist countries: An interpretation from the perspective of cooperation

Contents:

Author Info

  • Dimiter Ialnazov

    ()

  • Nikolay Nenovsky

    ()

Abstract

How do we account for the difficulties that former socialist countries experienced in the beginning of transition? Why is it that some countries performed relatively better (the Baltic and Central European countries) than others (Bulgaria and Romania)? Why in the second half of 1990s, and especially immediately before the EU enlargement, almost all of the former Soviet bloc countries achieved better results? And how can we explain the problems facing the new member-states after they joined the EU and euro funds began to flow in? In short, the basic hypothesis we present is the following both the transition phases and the diversity of trajectories of post-communist countries are the result of the difference in prevailing strategic behaviours. This difference determines the models of cooperation, namely the two main archetypes that of the prisoner’s dilemma and the stag hunter, applied at the socioeconomic context of post-communist transition. These two archetypal societal models are on their part conditional on the existence of external and internal anchors. While with the prisoner’s dilemma, that became a model of total exchange under the conditions of high social heterogeneity and broken informational channels, it is profitable not to cooperate, under the stag hunter model (a model involving a common goal, a common project) advantageous in general are cooperative strategies. The various countries in different phases can be approximated to either one or the other game – the prisoner’s dilemma or the stag hunter. A shift to the cooperative game becomes possible as a result of the operation of internal or external anchors. For instance, in the beginning of the transition, with no clear vision in sight amid an outburst of large diversity of economic and social actors, and old system’s information channels falling to pieces, the appropriate analytical model to apply would be the prisoner’s dilemma. And vice versa, later on, especially when a decision was adopted to join the EU and with pre-accession chapters being opened and closed, i.e. an external anchor emerging, appropriate for analytical reasoning becomes the stag hunter game model.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.icer.it/docs/wp2010/ICERwp03-10.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by ICER - International Centre for Economic Research in its series ICER Working Papers with number 03-2010.

as in new window
Length: 19 pages
Date of creation: Feb 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:icr:wpicer:03-2010

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Viale Settimio Severo, 63 - 10133 Torino - Italy
Phone: +39 011 6604828
Fax: +39 011 6600082
Email:
Web page: http://www.icer.it
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: post communist transformation; cooperation; anchoring;

Find related papers by JEL classification:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Kornai, Janos, 2000. "What the Change of System from Socialism to Capitalism Does and Does Not Mean," Scholarly Articles 3634160, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  2. Nikolay Nenovsky, 2010. "Monetary Regimes In Post-Communist Countries Some Long-Term Reflections," Analele Stiintifice ale Universitatii "Alexandru Ioan Cuza" din Iasi - Stiinte Economice, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, vol. 57, pages 217-234, november.
  3. Bernard Chavance, 2008. "Formal and Informal Institutional Change : the Experience of Postsocialist Transformation," European Journal of Comparative Economics, Cattaneo University (LIUC), vol. 5(1), pages 57-71, June.
  4. Beck, Thorsten & Laeven, Luc, 2005. "Institution building and growth in transition economies," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3657, The World Bank.
  5. Roland, Gerard & Verdier, Thierry, 2003. "Law enforcement and transition," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 47(4), pages 669-685, August.
  6. John Marangos, 2002. "A Political Economy Approach to the Neoclassical Model of Transition," American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 61(1), pages 259-276, 01.
  7. Leonid POLISHCHUK, 2008. "Misuse of Institutions: Patterns and Causes," The Journal of Comparative Economic Studies (JCES), The Japanese Society for Comparative Economic Studies (JSCES), vol. 4, pages 57-80, December.
  8. Yorgos Rizopoulos & Nikolay Nenovsky, 2004. "Peut-on mesurer le changement institutionnel du régime monétaire ?," Revue d'Économie Financière, Programme National Persée, vol. 75(2), pages 17-36.
  9. Svetozar Pejovich, 2003. "Understanding the Transaction Costs of Transition: it's the Culture, Stupid," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer, vol. 16(4), pages 347-361, December.
  10. Polterovich, Victor, 2007. "Institutional Trap," MPRA Paper 20595, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  11. Guido Tabellini, 2007. "The Scope of Cooperation: Norms and Incentives," Levine's Working Paper Archive 321307000000000866, David K. Levine.
  12. Jan Winiecki, 2004. "Determinants of catching up or falling behind: interaction of formal and informal institutions," Post-Communist Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(2), pages 137-152.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Nikolay Nenovsky, 2010. "The Bulgarian Economic Thought since 1989: A Personal View," ICER Working Papers 21-2010, ICER - International Centre for Economic Research.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:icr:wpicer:03-2010. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Alessandra Calosso).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.