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Good Times Are Drinking Times: Empirical Evidence on Business Cycles an Alcohol Sales in Sweden 1861-2000

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Author Info

  • Krüger, Niclas A

    ()
    (Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics)

  • Svensson, Mikael

    ()
    (Department of Business, Economics, Statistics and Informatics)

Abstract

This paper studies the relationship between the business cycle and alcohol sales in Sweden using a data set for the years 1861-2000. Using wavelet based band-pass filtering it is found that there is a pro-cyclical relationship, i.e. alcohol sales increases in short-term economic upturns. Using moving window techniques we see that the pro-cyclical relationship holds over the entire time period. We also find that alcohol sales are a long-memory process with non-stationary behavior, i.e. a shock in alcohol sales has persistent effects

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Örebro University, School of Business in its series Working Papers with number 2008:2.

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Length: 15 pages
Date of creation: 08 May 2008
Date of revision:
Publication status: Forthcoming in Applied Economics Letters.
Handle: RePEc:hhs:oruesi:2008_002

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Örebro University School of Business, SE - 701 82 ÖREBRO, Sweden
Phone: 019-30 30 00
Fax: 019-33 25 46
Web page: http://www.oru.se/Institutioner/Handelshogskolan-vid-Orebro-universitet/
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Keywords: Businesscycles:Alcohol:Sweden;

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References

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  1. Svensson, Mikael, 2007. "Do not go breaking your heart: Do economic upturns really increase heart attack mortality?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 65(4), pages 833-841, August.
  2. Petri Böckerman & Edvard Johansson & Ritva Prättälä & Antti Uutela, 2005. "Alcohol mortality, drinking behaviour, and business cycles: are slumps really dry seasons?," HEW 0506002, EconWPA.
  3. Gerdtham, Ulf-G. & Johannesson, Magnus, 2005. "Business cycles and mortality: results from Swedish microdata," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 60(1), pages 205-218, January.
  4. Christopher Ruhm, 1994. "Economic Conditions and Alcohol Problems," NBER Working Papers 4914, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Peter C.B. Phillips, 1999. "Discrete Fourier Transforms of Fractional Processes," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 1243, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
  6. Christopher J. Ruhm, 1996. "Are Recessions Good For Your Health?," NBER Working Papers 5570, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Ruhm, Christopher J., 2003. "Good times make you sick," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 637-658, July.
  8. Neumayer, Eric, 2004. "Recessions lower (some) mortality rates:: evidence from Germany," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 58(6), pages 1037-1047, March.
  9. Ruhm, Christopher J., 2003. "Healthy Living in Hard Times," IZA Discussion Papers 711, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  10. Thomas S. Dee, 2001. "Alcohol abuse and economic conditions: Evidence from repeated cross-sections of individual-level data," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 10(3), pages 257-270.
  11. Edvard Johansson & Petri Böckerman & Ritva Prättälä & Antti Uutela, 2006. "Alcohol-related mortality, drinking behavior, and business cycles," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer, vol. 7(3), pages 212-217, September.
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Cited by:
  1. Chad Cotti & Richard A. Dunn & Nathan Tefft, 2013. "The Dow is Killing Me: Risky Health Behaviors and the Stock Market," Working Papers 20, University of Connecticut, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Charles J. Zwick Center for Food and Resource Policy.

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