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Pattern of Foreign Direct Investment in Emerging Economies: An Exploration

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  • Patibandla, Murali

    (Department of International Economics and Management, Copenhagen Business School)

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    Abstract

    Until recently major part of FDI flows had been among developed economies with similar relative factor endowments, income levels and market institutions such as property rights regimes. Consequently, major theoretical streams of FDI in economics could simplify FDI as a substitute for intra-industry trade by incorporating transportation costs and economies of scale (multi-plants). In the recent years, developing economies have increased their share of FDI inflows significantly (40%). Explanation of magnitude and pattern of FDI into developing economies requires a complex ray of factors. This is because these economies differ significantly from developed economies and also among each other in economic development levels and endowment of market institutions. This paper attempts to develop a conceptual framework to explain pattern of FDI in developing economies by identifying the determinants on the supply and demand side and market institutional conditions. Differences in the endowment of the factors in a set determine the pattern of FDI in these economies. This paper illustrates this by taking the case study of China and India.

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    File URL: http://openarchive.cbs.dk/cbsweb/handle/10398/6553
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Copenhagen Business School, Department of International Economics and Management in its series Working Papers with number 1-2001.

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    Length: 37 pages
    Date of creation: 01 Feb 2001
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:hhb:cbsint:2001-001

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    Postal: Department of International Economics and Management, Copenhagen Business School, Howitzvej 60, DK-2000 Frederiksberg, Denmark
    Phone: +45 3815 2515
    Fax: +45 3815 2500
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    Web page: http://www.cbs.dk/departments/int/
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    Related research

    Keywords: Emerging Economies; Pattern of FDI; China and India;

    References

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    1. Li, David D., 1996. "A Theory of Ambiguous Property Rights in Transition Economies: The Case of the Chinese Non-State Sector," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(1), pages 1-19, August.
    2. Oliver Hart & Sanford Grossman, 1985. "The Costs and Benefits of Ownership: A Theory of Vertical and Lateral Integration," Working papers 372, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
    3. Romer, Paul M, 1990. "Endogenous Technological Change," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(5), pages S71-102, October.
    4. David D. Li, 1996. "A Theory of Ambiguous Property Rights in Transition Economies: The Case of the Chinese Non-State Sector," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 8, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    5. Lee G. Branstetter & Robert C. Feenstra, 1999. "Trade and Foreign Direct Investment in China: A Political Economy Approach," NBER Working Papers 7100, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Batra, Raveendra N & Ramachandran, Rama, 1980. "Multinational Firms and the Theory of International Trade and Investment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(3), pages 278-90, June.
    7. Richard E Caves, 1998. "Research on International Business: Problems and Prospects," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 29(1), pages 5-19, March.
    8. Ahlstrom, David & Bruton, Garry D. & Lui, Steven S. Y., 2000. "Navigating China's changing economy: Strategies for private firms," Business Horizons, Elsevier, vol. 43(1), pages 5-15.
    9. Avinash Dixit, 2003. "Some Lessons from Transaction-Cost Politics for Less-Developed Countries," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 15(2), pages 107-133, 07.
    10. Spiller, Pablo T, 1996. "Institutions and Commitment," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 5(2), pages 421-52.
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    Cited by:
    1. Chakraborty, Chandana & Rawlins, Glenville, 2004. "Financial resource flows, macro policy response, and the socio-economic environment: the experience of Latin America and East Asia," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 469-489, September.
    2. Oikonomou, Vlasis & Patel, Martin & Worrell, Ernst, 2006. "Climate policy: Bucket or drainer?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(18), pages 3656-3668, December.

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