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WTO, agriculture, and developing countries

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  • Diaz-Bonilla, Eugenio
  • Robinson, Sherman
  • Thomas, Marcelle
  • Yanoma, Yukitsugu

Abstract

The objective of this paper is to present a survey of trade issues in agriculture from the perspective of developing countries. Developing countries are a large percentage of the World Trade Organization (WTO) membership, and agriculture is critical for their economic growth, poverty alleviation, food security, and environmental sustainability. First, this paper identifies trends in production, consumption, and trade of food and agriculture over the last decades. Some of the significant developments include the emergence of oilseeds and fruits and vegetables as the main exports from developing countries, replacing traditional exports such as sugar, coffee and cocoa. The trends also show a worsening of developing countries' net trade position due in part to income growth and population pressures, but also to economic policies in general, and trade policies in particular, both in developing and industrialized countries. Second, this paper focuses on some of the main development issues linked to the WTO agricultural negotiations. The objective is to align the different legal components and subcomponents of the negotiations under the Agreement on Agriculture, with developing countries' final objectives of sustainable economic growth, poverty alleviation, and food security. This paper concludes that the problems for developing countries are not legal constraints under the AoA, but the lack of financial and human resources and institutional capabilities. To link negotiations to their development goals, developing countries must consider the issue of funding. Finally, developing countries, most of which have embarked in unilateral liberalization over the last decade, should ask that the higher levels of protection in industrialized countries be reduced first.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in its series TMD discussion papers with number 81.

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Date of creation: 2001
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Handle: RePEc:fpr:tmddps:81

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Keywords: TMD ;

References

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  1. Colby, Hunter & Diao, Xinshen & Tuan, Francis C., 2001. "China's WTO Accession: Conflicts with Domestic Agricultural Policies and Institutions," Estey Centre Journal of International Law and Trade Policy, Estey Centre for Law and Economics in International Trade, vol. 2(1).
  2. Arndt, Channing & Jensen, Henning Tarp & Robinson, Sherman & Tarp, Finn, 1999. "Marketing margins and agricultural technology in Mozambique:," TMD discussion papers 43, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  3. Colby, Hunter & Diao, Xinshen & Tuan, Francis, 2001. "China's WTO accession," TMD discussion papers 68, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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Cited by:
  1. Diao, Xinshen & Diaz-Bonilla, Eugenio & Robinson, Sherman & Orden, David, 2005. "Tell me where it hurts, an' I'll tell you who to call," MTID discussion papers 84, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  2. Nouve, Kofi & Staatz, John M., 2003. "The Food Security Debate In West Africa Following The Wto Agreements On Agriculture," Staff Papers 11746, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  3. Grant, Jason H. & Boys, Kathryn A., 2010. "Agriculture and the World Trade Organization: Does Membership Make a Difference?," Working Papers 90886, Canadian Agricultural Trade Policy Research Network.
  4. Hewitt, Joanna, 2008. "Impact evaluation of research by the International Food Policy Research Institute on agricultural trade liberalization, developing countries, and WTO's Doha negotiations:," Impact assessments 28, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

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