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Marketing margins and agricultural technology in Mozambique:

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  • Arndt, Channing
  • Jensen, Henning Tarp
  • Robinson, Sherman
  • Tarp, Finn

Abstract

Improvements in agricultural productivity and reductions in marketing costs in Mozambique are analysed using a computable general equilibrium (CGE) model. The model incorporates detailed marketing margins and separates household demand for marketed and home-produced goods. Simulations improving agricultural technology and lowering marketing margins yield gains across the economy, but with differential impacts on factor returns. A combined scenario reveals significant synergy effects, as welfare gains exceed the sum of gains from the individual scenarios. Factor returns increase in roughly equal proportions, an attractive feature when assessing the political feasibility of policy initiatives.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in its series TMD discussion papers with number 43.

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Date of creation: 1999
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Handle: RePEc:fpr:tmddps:43

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Keywords: Rice Prices Models.; Agricultural development.; Marketing.; Technology.; Mozambique.; Computable general equilibrium (CGE).;

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Cited by:
  1. Llop Llop, Maria & Ponce Alifonso, Xavier,, 2012. "Agriculture, technological change and environmental sustainability: Looking for a win-win water policy strategy," Working Papers 2072/203158, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Department of Economics.
  2. Matthew Bunce & Sergio Rosendo & Katrina Brown, 2010. "Perceptions of climate change, multiple stressors and livelihoods on marginal African coasts," Environment, Development and Sustainability, Springer, vol. 12(3), pages 407-440, June.
  3. Diaz-Bonilla, Eugenio & Robinson, Sherman & Thomas, Marcelle & Yanoma, Yukitsugu, 2001. "WTO, agriculture, and developing countries," TMD discussion papers 81, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  4. Gunawardena, Aruni, 2012. "Effects of Increasing Agricultural Productivity: A Computable General Equilibrium Analysis for Sri Lanka," 2012 Conference (56th), February 7-10, 2012, Freemantle, Australia 124313, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
  5. Arndt, Channing & Robinson, Sherman & Tarp, Finn, 1999. "Parameter estimation for a computable general equilibrium model: a maximum entropy approach," TMD discussion papers 40, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  6. Thomas Hertel & Jeffrey Reimer, 2005. "Predicting the poverty impacts of trade reform," The Journal of International Trade & Economic Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(4), pages 377-405.
  7. Henning Tarp Jensen & Sherman Robinson & Finn Tarp, 2004. "General Equilibrium Measures of Agricultural Policy Bias in Fifteen Developing Countries," Discussion Papers 04-25, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
  8. Chau, Nancy H. & Goto, Hideaki & Kanbur, Ravi, 2009. "Middlemen, Non-Profits, and Poverty," Working Papers 55931, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management.
  9. Heltberg, Rasmus & Simler, Kenneth & Tarp, Finn, 2001. "Public Spending and Poverty in Mozambique," Working Paper Series UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  10. Thomas W. Hertel, 2006. "A Survey of Findings on the Poverty Impacts of Agricultural Trade Liberalization," The Electronic Journal of Agricultural and Development Economics, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, vol. 3(1), pages 1-26.
  11. Henning Tarp Jensen & Finn Tarp, 2005. "Trade Liberalization and Spatial Inequality: a Methodological Innovation in a Vietnamese Perspective," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 9(1), pages 69-86, 02.
  12. Jensen, Henning Tarp & Tarp, Finn & Hong, Vu Xuan Nguyet & Man Hai, Nguyen & Thanh, Le Ha, 2008. "Economic Instruments and the Pollution Impact of the 2006-2010 Vietnam Socio-Economic Development Plan," MPRA Paper 29790, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  13. Jensen, Tarp & Tarp, Finn, 2007. "Agricultural Technology and Marketing Margins in Vietnam," MPRA Paper 29820, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  14. Bautista, Romeo M., 2000. "Agriculture-based development," TMD discussion papers 51, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  15. Arndt, Channing & Schiller, Rico & Tarp, Finn, 2001. "Grain transport and rural credit in Mozambique: solving the space-time problem," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 25(1), pages 59-70, June.

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