Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Aggregated vs. disaggregated data in regression analysis: implications for inference

Contents:

Author Info

  • Thomas A. Garrett

Abstract

This note demonstrates why regression coefficients and their statistical significance differ across degrees of data aggregation. Given the frequent use of aggregated data to explain individual behavior, data aggregation can result in misleading conclusions regarding the economic behavior of individuals.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://research.stlouisfed.org/wp/more/2002-024/
Download Restriction: no

File URL: http://research.stlouisfed.org/wp/2002/2002-024.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis in its series Working Papers with number 2002-024.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: 2002
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:fip:fedlwp:2002-024

Contact details of provider:
Postal: P.O. Box 442, St. Louis, MO 63166
Fax: (314)444-8753
Web page: http://www.stlouisfed.org/
More information through EDIRC

Order Information:
Email:

Related research

Keywords: Econometrics ; Regression analysis;

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Carroll, Christopher D & Fuhrer, Jeffrey C & Wilcox, David W, 1994. "Does Consumer Sentiment Forecast Household Spending? If So, Why?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(5), pages 1397-1408, December.
  2. Marvin Goodfriend, 1991. "Information-aggregation bias," Working Paper 91-06, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond.
  3. Jason Bram & Sydney Ludvigson, 1997. "Does consumer confidence forecast household expenditure?: A sentiment index horse race," Research Paper 9708, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  4. Cherry, Todd L. & List, John A., 2002. "Aggregation bias in the economic model of crime," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 75(1), pages 81-86, March.
  5. George C. Davis, 1997. "Product Aggregation Bias as a Specification Error in Demand Systems," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 79(1), pages 100-109.
  6. Robert E. Hall, 1987. "Consumption," NBER Working Papers 2265, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Mittelhammer, Ronald C. & Shi, Hongqi & Wahl, Thomas I., 1996. "Accounting For Aggregation Bias In Almost Ideal Demand Systems," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 21(02), December.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Stephan von Cramon-Taubadel & Jens-Peter Loy & Jochen Meyer, 2006. "The impact of cross-sectional data aggregation on the measurement of vertical price transmission: An experiment with German food prices," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(4), pages 505-522.
  2. von Cramon-Taubadel, Stephan & Loy, Jens-Peter & Meyer, Jochen, 2006. "Data Aggregation and Vertical Price Transmission: An Experiment with German Food Prices," 2006 Annual Meeting, August 12-18, 2006, Queensland, Australia 25291, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  3. Michael McMahon & Gabriel Sterne & Jamie Thompson, 2005. "The role of ICT in the global investment cycle," Bank of England working papers 257, Bank of England.
  4. Thomas A. Garrett & Gary A. Wagner, 2009. "Red Ink in the Rearview Mirror: Local Fiscal Conditions and the Issuance of Traffic Tickets," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 52(1), pages 71-90, 02.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fip:fedlwp:2002-024. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Anna Xiao).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.