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Markup variation and endogenous fluctuations in the price of investment goods

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Author Info

  • Max Floetotto
  • Nir Jaimovich
  • Seth Pruitt

Abstract

The two sector model presented in this note suggests a simple structural decomposition of movements in the price of investment goods into exogenous and endogenous sources. The endogenous fluctuations arise in the presence of countercyclical markups which vary differently across the consumption and investment sectors. In turn, the movements in the markups are due to endogenous procyclical net business formation. The model, while being consistent with the countercyclicality of the price of investment goods, suggests that about a quarter of the movement in the price series can be attributed to this endogenous mechanism.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.) in its series International Finance Discussion Papers with number 968.

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Date of creation: 2009
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Handle: RePEc:fip:fedgif:968

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Related research

Keywords: Stock - Prices ; Business cycles;

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Cited by:
  1. Giorgio E. Primiceri & Andrea Tambalotti & Alejandro Justiniano, 2009. "Investment Shocks and the Relative Price of Investment," 2009 Meeting Papers 686, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  2. Alain Gabler, 2014. "Relative Price Fluctuations in a Multi-Sector Model with Imperfect Competition," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 17(3), pages 474-483, July.
  3. Sohei Kaihatsu & Takushi Kurozumi, 2014. "Sources of Business Fluctuations: Financial or Technology Shocks?," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 17(2), pages 224-242, April.
  4. Lilia Cavallari, 2012. "Modelling Entry Costs: Does It Matter For Business Cycle Transmission?," Working Papers 0712, CREI Università degli Studi Roma Tre, revised 2012.
  5. Yaniv Yedid-Levi, 2012. "Why Does Employment in All Major Sectors Move Together over the Business Cycle?," 2012 Meeting Papers 677, Society for Economic Dynamics.

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