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Tied migration and subsequent employment: evidence from couples in Britain

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  • Taylor, Mark P.

Abstract

We use unique information on migration behaviour and the reasons for migration to study the impact of tied migration on labour market outcomes among husbands and wives. We find that fewer than 2% of couples migrate for job-related reasons, and that the majority of these move for reasons associated with the husbands job. Estimates from dynamic random effects models indicate that husbands and wives in couples that migrated for job-related reasons suffer lower job retention rates than nonmigrants. Furthermore we find that tied migration reduces the probability of subsequent employment for both husbands and wives. In particular, tied migration has a large negative impact on job retention rates among wives.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for Social and Economic Research in its series ISER Working Paper Series with number 2006-05.

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Date of creation: 01 Mar 2006
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Publication status: published
Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2006-05

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Postal: Publications Office, Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of Essex, Wivenhoe Park, Colchester, Essex CO4 3SQ UK
Phone: 44-1206-872957
Fax: 44-1206-873151
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Web page: https://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/
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Postal: Publications Office, Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of Essex, Wivenhoe Park, Colchester, Essex CO4 3SQ UK
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Web: https://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/publications/

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References

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  1. Bartel, Ann P, 1979. "The Migration Decision: What Role Does Job Mobility Play?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 69(5), pages 775-86, December.
  2. Satu Nivalainen, 2004. "Determinants of family migration: short moves vs. long moves," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 17(1), pages 157-175, February.
  3. Jeffrey J. Yankow, 2003. "Migration, Job Change, and Wage Growth: A New Perspective on the Pecuniary Return to Geographic Mobility," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 43(3), pages 483-516.
  4. Chiappori, Pierre-André & Fortin, Bernard & Lacroix, Guy, 1998. "Household Labor Supply, Sharing Rule and the Marriage Market," Cahiers de recherche 9810, Université Laval - Département d'économique.
  5. Paul Boyle & Thomas J. Cooke & Keith Halfacree & Darren Smith, 2002. "A cross-national study of the effects of family migration on women's labour market status: some difficulties with integrating microdata from two censuses," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 165(3), pages 465-480.
  6. Paul Gregg & Rosanna Scutella & Jonathan Wadsworth, 2010. "Reconciling workless measures at the individual and household level. Theory and evidence from the United States, Britain, Germany, Spain and Australia," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 23(1), pages 139-167, January.
  7. Sandell, Steven H, 1977. "Women and the Economics of Family Migration," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 59(4), pages 406-14, November.
  8. Mincer, Jacob, 1978. "Family Migration Decisions," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(5), pages 749-73, October.
  9. Arulampalam, Wiji & Booth, Alison L & Taylor, Mark P, 2000. "Unemployment Persistence," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 52(1), pages 24-50, January.
  10. Fortin, Bernard & Lacroix, Guy, 1997. "A Test of the Unitary and Collective Models of Household Labour Supply," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 107(443), pages 933-55, July.
  11. Arulampalam, Wiji, 2002. "State Dependence in Unemployment Incidence: Evidence for British Men Revisited," IZA Discussion Papers 630, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  12. Boheim, Rene & Taylor, Mark P, 2002. "Tied Down or Rome to Move? Investigating the Relationships between Housing Tenure, Employment Status and Residential Mobility in Britain," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 49(4), pages 369-92, September.
  13. Browning, Martin & Francois Bourguignon & Pierre-Andre Chiappori & Valerie Lechene, 1994. "Income and Outcomes: A Structural Model of Intrahousehold Allocation," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 102(6), pages 1067-96, December.
  14. Boheim, Rene & Taylor, Mark P., 2007. "From the dark end of the street to the bright side of the road? The wage returns to migration in Britain," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 99-117, January.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Åström, Johanna & Westerlund, Olle, 2011. "Sex and Migration: Who is the Tied Mover?," HUI Working Papers 33, HUI Research.
  2. Darja Reuschke, 2011. "Self-Employment and Geographical Mobility in Germany," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 417, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  3. Crespo, Nuno & Simoes, Nadia & Moreira, Sandrina B., 2013. "Gender Differences in Occupational Mobility – Evidence from Portugal," MPRA Paper 49195, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Martyn Andrews & Ken Clark & William Whittaker, 2011. "The determinants of regional migration in Great Britain: a duration approach," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 174(1), pages 127-153, January.
  5. repec:ese:iserwp:2010-05 is not listed on IDEAS
  6. D. Isebaert, 2013. "Housing Tenure and Geographical Mobility in Belgium," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 13/855, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.
  7. Jean-Jacques Arrighi & Céline Gasquet & Valérie Roux, 2009. "Residential Mobility at the Start of a Working Career: Women at a Disadvantage," Economie et Statistique, Institut National de la Statistique et des Etudes Economiques, vol. 415, pages 61-80., March.
  8. David McArthur & Inge Thorsen, 2011. "Determinants of internal migration in Norway," ERSA conference papers ersa10p532, European Regional Science Association.
  9. Thomas J. Cooke, 2013. "All tied up: Tied staying and tied migration within the United States, 1997 to 2007," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 29(30), pages 817-836, October.
  10. Zaiceva, Anzelika, 2010. "East-West migration and gender: Is there a differential effect for migrant women?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 443-454, April.

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