Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Markets for Communist Human Capital: Returns to Education and Experience in the Czech Republic and Slovakia

Contents:

Author Info

  • Robert S. Chase
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    This research examines differences in earnings structure between Communist and post-Communist Czech Republic and Slovakia using four sets of similar micro-data. It presents hypotheses about how earnings dispersion returns to education and returns to experience will change across regimes and tests those hypotheses using earnings equations. From approximately 2.5 percent in 1984, the return to education increased to approximately 5 percent by 1993. During that period, returns to experience fell. Though women have higher returns to education, returns for men increased more across regime change. Those with academic secondary education experienced a particularly large earnings increase. Earnings structure changes appear larger in the Czech Republic than in Slovakia.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://www.econ.yale.edu/growth_pdf/cdp770.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Economic Growth Center, Yale University in its series Working Papers with number 770.

    as in new window
    Length: 37 pages
    Date of creation: Jan 1997
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:egc:wpaper:770

    Contact details of provider:
    Postal: PO Box 8269, New Haven CT 06520-8269
    Phone: (203) 432-3610
    Fax: (203) 432-3898
    Web page: http://www.econ.yale.edu/
    More information through EDIRC

    Related research

    Keywords: Post-Communist Transition; Czech Republic; Slovakia; Returns to Education; Returns to Experience;

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. Commander, Simon & Coricelli, Fabrizio & Staehr, Karsten, 1991. "Wages and employment in the transition to a market economy," Policy Research Working Paper Series 736, The World Bank.
    2. Orazem, Peter & Vodopivec, Milan, 1995. "Winners and Losers in Transition: Returns to Education, Experience, and Gender in Slovenia," Staff General Research Papers 5270, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    3. Lawrence F. Katz & Kevin M. Murphy, 1991. "Changes in Relative Wages, 1963-1987: Supply and Demand Factors," NBER Working Papers 3927, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
    5. Killingsworth, Mark R. & Heckman, James J., 1987. "Female labor supply: A survey," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & R. Layard (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 2, pages 103-204 Elsevier.
    6. Alan B. Krueger & Jorn-Steffen Pischke, 1995. "A Comparative Analysis of East and West German Labor Markets: Before and After Unification," NBER Chapters, in: Differences and Changes in Wage Structures, pages 405-446 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Steven J. Davis, 1992. "Cross-Country Patterns of Change in Relative Wages," NBER Working Papers 4085, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Jan Svejnar, 1991. "Microeconomic Issues in the Transition to a Market Economy," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 5(4), pages 123-138, Fall.
    9. Schultz, Theodore W, 1975. "The Value of the Ability to Deal with Disequilibria," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 13(3), pages 827-46, September.
    10. Krueger, Alan B & Summers, Lawrence H, 1988. "Efficiency Wages and the Inter-industry Wage Structure," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 56(2), pages 259-93, March.
    11. Juhn, Chinhui & Murphy, Kevin M & Pierce, Brooks, 1993. "Wage Inequality and the Rise in Returns to Skill," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(3), pages 410-42, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. Borisov Gleb, 2005. "The human capital heterogeneity at the Russian labor market," EERC Working Paper Series 01-151e, EERC Research Network, Russia and CIS.
    2. Miroslav Stefanik, 2011. "Changes in private returns to education caused by the tertiary education expansion in Slovakia," Review of Applied Socio-Economic Research, Pro Global Science Association, vol. 1(2), pages 167-176, December.
    3. Boris Vujčić & Vedran Šošić, 2009. "Return to Education and the Changing Role of Credentials in the Croatian Labor Market," Transition Studies Review, Springer, vol. 16(1), pages 189-205, May.
    4. Falaris, Evangelos M., 2004. "Private and public sector wages in Bulgaria," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 56-72, March.
    5. Kevin Denny & Patrick Orla Doyle, 2005. "Returns to basic skills in Central and Eastern Europe - a semi-parametric approach," Working Papers 200507, School Of Economics, University College Dublin.

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:egc:wpaper:770. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Louise Danishevsky).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.