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Judgment under Emotional Uncertainty: The Effects of Specific Emotions and Their Associated Certainty Appraisals on Information Processing

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  • Tiedens, Larissa Z.

    (Stanford U)

  • Linton, Susan
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    Abstract

    The authors argue that emotions characterized by certainty appraisals lead to heuristic information processing, while emotions characterized by uncertainty appraisals lead systematic information processing. The firs study demonstrated that participants who are induced to feel emotions characterized by certainty (disgust and happiness) are more certain about their judgments when making a set of unrelated predictions than participants who are induced to feel emotions associated with uncertainty (fear and hope). In Study 2, a persuasion paradigm was used to show that emotions associated with certainty (anger and contentment) resulted in greater reliance on heuristic cues than emotions associated with uncertainty (worry and surprise). Study 3 showed that stereotype use increased after exposure to a film clip that induced disgust (a certainty associated emotion) than one that induced fear (an uncertainty associated emotion). In contrast to previous theories linking valence and processing, these findings suggest that the certainty appraisal content of emotions is an important characteristic in determining whether people engage in heuristic or systematic processing.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Stanford University, Graduate School of Business in its series Research Papers with number 1629.

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    Date of creation: Dec 2001
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    Handle: RePEc:ecl:stabus:1629

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    Cited by:
    1. Vendrik, Maarten C.M. & Schwieren, Christiane, 2009. "Identification, Screening and Stereotyping in Labour Market Discrimination," IZA Discussion Papers 4571, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Chan, Chien Sheng Richard & Park, Haemin Dennis, 2013. "The influence of dispositional affect and cognition on venture investment portfolio concentration," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 397-412.
    3. Elfenbein, Hillary Anger, 2007. "Emotion in Organizations: A Review in Stages," Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, Working Paper Series qt2bn0n9mv, Institute of Industrial Relations, UC Berkeley.
    4. Milkman, Katherine L., 2012. "Unsure what the future will bring? You may overindulge: Uncertainty increases the appeal of wants over shoulds," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 119(2), pages 163-176.
    5. Agrawal, Nidhi & Han, DaHee & Duhachek, Adam, 2013. "Emotional agency appraisals influence responses to preference inconsistent information," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 120(1), pages 87-97.
    6. Mannberg, Andréa, 2012. "Risk and rationalization—The role of affect and cognitive dissonance for sexual risk taking," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 56(6), pages 1325-1337.
    7. Ku, Gillian, 2008. "Learning to de-escalate: The effects of regret in escalation of commitment," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 105(2), pages 221-232, March.

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